The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged art

4,785 notes

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




(via caramelzappa)

Filed under I have to repeat this to myself sometimes but it is the truth writing art long posts rock on

5,641 notes

ursulavernon:

lisalu22:

I love Neil Gaiman so damn much. Best advice on how to raise a reader—let them read…whatever they want to read.

My mother—who meant well!—was always trying to get me to read “good” books. “Garbage in, garbage out,” she would say grimly, as I loaded up on Star Trek novels and Dragonlance, and try to get me to read improving literature like “Jane Eyre” and “Two Years Before The Mast.”
Today I write children’s books for a living. She has since apologized and I have still never read “Jane Eyre.”

ursulavernon:

lisalu22:

I love Neil Gaiman so damn much. Best advice on how to raise a reader—let them read…whatever they want to read.

My mother—who meant well!—was always trying to get me to read “good” books. “Garbage in, garbage out,” she would say grimly, as I loaded up on Star Trek novels and Dragonlance, and try to get me to read improving literature like “Jane Eyre” and “Two Years Before The Mast.”

Today I write children’s books for a living. She has since apologized and I have still never read “Jane Eyre.”

Filed under reading art yep queue

15,095 notes

isaia:

tempest-lavalle:

leseanthomas:

What some people think animation production is.

A-freakin’-men.
I have a little story to tell about my time in school.
There was an art professor we had. I will simply call him Rick. Rick was the professor for most of the classic skills you’d need as an artist, no matter the discipline. Life drawing, anatomy, etc. He’d been an illustrator most of his life and his skill was not to be denied. He was REALLY good.
Rick worked with traditional media only; paints, markers, colored pencil, charcoal, etc etc. There is nothing wrong with this, let me clear that up. Learning the skills it takes to use traditional media as well as anatomy and how to look at things in the world is essential as an artist. This is what Rick taught.
BUT.
Rick did not have any respect what so ever for digital art, animation, or media of any kind. So much so, that not only were his grading conventions harsh, he didn’t take personal improvement into account. Instead, he compared most of the students to his own skills. Not to mention he made sure to comment at EVERY opportunity about how using a computer to make art was taking the easy route. Because the computer did ALL THE WORK FOR YOU. HMMMMMM. In essence, most of the animation students especially disliked him, because we tended to be the ones he was harshest on, seeing as we did the majority of our work and projects in CGI, photoshop, flash, or illustrator.
Needless to say, he got many many MANY complaints. Apparently, he obtained SO many complaints, the school forced him to attend one quarter of one of our basic animation/modeling courses (the school operated on 12 week quarters as opposed to semesters). In lieu of losing his job, Rick had no choice but to join the very students he’d dismissed as not real artists in class everyday for 3 months, learning the very basics of 3D animation and modeling.
I will never forget the day we were attempting to animate a bullet shattering a pane of glass. Rick was seated next to me in the lab and during our work period, he leans over and in a very quiet, sheepish voice, asks me;
"Um…Tasha…could you show me how you did that?"
I helped him out, of course. And from that point on, I think he finally realized just how much WORK goes into ANY piece of work. No matter how you make it. By the end of the quarter, he actually came forward during one of his own classes and apologized to EVERYONE for his attitude.
The computer is simply another tool for creating art. It takes time to learn how to use it, just as it does learning the techniques of a brush or pen.
Because trust me; if any of the above buttons actually existed, WE’D FUCKING USE THEM.

Ya’ll listen to my homie, Tasha right here.This story is for real. 

isaia:

tempest-lavalle:

leseanthomas:

What some people think animation production is.

A-freakin’-men.

I have a little story to tell about my time in school.

There was an art professor we had. I will simply call him Rick. Rick was the professor for most of the classic skills you’d need as an artist, no matter the discipline. Life drawing, anatomy, etc. He’d been an illustrator most of his life and his skill was not to be denied. He was REALLY good.

Rick worked with traditional media only; paints, markers, colored pencil, charcoal, etc etc. There is nothing wrong with this, let me clear that up. Learning the skills it takes to use traditional media as well as anatomy and how to look at things in the world is essential as an artist. This is what Rick taught.

BUT.

Rick did not have any respect what so ever for digital art, animation, or media of any kind. So much so, that not only were his grading conventions harsh, he didn’t take personal improvement into account. Instead, he compared most of the students to his own skills. Not to mention he made sure to comment at EVERY opportunity about how using a computer to make art was taking the easy route. Because the computer did ALL THE WORK FOR YOU. HMMMMMM. In essence, most of the animation students especially disliked him, because we tended to be the ones he was harshest on, seeing as we did the majority of our work and projects in CGI, photoshop, flash, or illustrator.

Needless to say, he got many many MANY complaints. Apparently, he obtained SO many complaints, the school forced him to attend one quarter of one of our basic animation/modeling courses (the school operated on 12 week quarters as opposed to semesters). In lieu of losing his job, Rick had no choice but to join the very students he’d dismissed as not real artists in class everyday for 3 months, learning the very basics of 3D animation and modeling.

I will never forget the day we were attempting to animate a bullet shattering a pane of glass. Rick was seated next to me in the lab and during our work period, he leans over and in a very quiet, sheepish voice, asks me;

"Um…Tasha…could you show me how you did that?"

I helped him out, of course. And from that point on, I think he finally realized just how much WORK goes into ANY piece of work. No matter how you make it. By the end of the quarter, he actually came forward during one of his own classes and apologized to EVERYONE for his attitude.

The computer is simply another tool for creating art. It takes time to learn how to use it, just as it does learning the techniques of a brush or pen.

Because trust me; if any of the above buttons actually existed, WE’D FUCKING USE THEM.

Ya’ll listen to my homie, Tasha right here.
This story is for real. 

(via zada2011)

Filed under long posts art queue

11 notes

biologicalmarginalia:


Aldrovandus gives us a curious specimen of a horse, which the artist has drawn with the slashed trunk breeches of the time. He says that Fincelius, quoting Licosthenes, mentions that this animal had its skin thus slashed, from its birth, and was to be seen about the year 1555. Its skin was as thick as sole-leather. It was, probably, an ideal Zebra.

So, apparently Ulisse Aldrovandi (or his artist?) interpreted Zebras as being horses wearing then-stylish clothes. Huh.
From Curious Creatures in Zoology.

biologicalmarginalia:

Aldrovandus gives us a curious specimen of a horse, which the artist has drawn with the slashed trunk breeches of the time. He says that Fincelius, quoting Licosthenes, mentions that this animal had its skin thus slashed, from its birth, and was to be seen about the year 1555. Its skin was as thick as sole-leather. It was, probably, an ideal Zebra.

So, apparently Ulisse Aldrovandi (or his artist?) interpreted Zebras as being horses wearing then-stylish clothes. Huh.

From Curious Creatures in Zoology.

Filed under oh dear zebras art equines queue

16 notes

biologicalmarginalia:

Dolphins in ancient art that were discussed in my latest post of Lord Geekington. First and second are Bronze Age depictions from a Late Helladic blade and the palace at Knossos. Strange wavy coloration aside, they’re immediately recognizable. The next two are 5th Century BC coins from Syracuse (Sicily) with small and simple but still excellent dolphins. The final two are from 4th Century Eretria and show one very realistic dolphin… aside from the human riding it… and one which is curiously stylized to have superfluous fins and a curved rostrum. 

Filed under history cetaceans art dolphins queue

335 notes

ursulavernon:

terriwindling:

"One reason that people have artist’s block is that they do not respect the law of dormancy in nature. Trees don’t produce fruit all year long, constantly. They have a point where they go dormant. And when you are in a dormant period creatively, if you can arrange your life to do the technical tasks that don’t take creativity, you are essentially preparing for the spring when it will all blossom again."
- Marshall Vandruff
(via Amanda Palmer via Neil Gaiman via Jonathan Carroll)
The little tree person is from one of my sketchbooks.

It took me SO LONG to learn this. I still flog myself sometimes over not being able to make art 24-7.

ursulavernon:

terriwindling:

"One reason that people have artist’s block is that they do not respect the law of dormancy in nature. Trees don’t produce fruit all year long, constantly. They have a point where they go dormant. And when you are in a dormant period creatively, if you can arrange your life to do the technical tasks that don’t take creativity, you are essentially preparing for the spring when it will all blossom again."

- Marshall Vandruff

(via Amanda Palmer via Neil Gaiman via Jonathan Carroll)

The little tree person is from one of my sketchbooks.

It took me SO LONG to learn this. I still flog myself sometimes over not being able to make art 24-7.

Filed under yep art writing queue

65,075 notes

busket:

thereallightsabovearbys:

starexorcist:

Dont ask artists for free art you scrubs

How to waste your talent while losing your friends all at once because all you care about is money: A tumblr guide on how to be a cunt to those who admire you.
Imagine if the Mona Lisa was a commission and s/he had no money.

the mona lisa was a commission you shitshill, that’s how artists make a fucking living. it’s how we get the money to pay for things we need, because we don’t want to spend all our time working in a shitty job instead of doing things that are important to us, like working on personal projects or spending time with people we like. by thinking that you deserve free art is basically telling them “your time and skill isn’t worth anything but my personal enjoyment!” and if someone only wanted to be friends with me for free art, i don’t want that friendship because that sounds like an awful friend. artists are people with lives and often art is our only source of income and if you really admired us you would understand and support that.

busket:

thereallightsabovearbys:

starexorcist:

Dont ask artists for free art you scrubs

How to waste your talent while losing your friends all at once because all you care about is money: A tumblr guide on how to be a cunt to those who admire you.

Imagine if the Mona Lisa was a commission and s/he had no money.

the mona lisa was a commission you shitshill, that’s how artists make a fucking living. it’s how we get the money to pay for things we need, because we don’t want to spend all our time working in a shitty job instead of doing things that are important to us, like working on personal projects or spending time with people we like. by thinking that you deserve free art is basically telling them “your time and skill isn’t worth anything but my personal enjoyment!” and if someone only wanted to be friends with me for free art, i don’t want that friendship because that sounds like an awful friend. artists are people with lives and often art is our only source of income and if you really admired us you would understand and support that.

(via zada2011)

Filed under long posts art yep queue

33,764 notes

metrikfire:

I would like to make a public service announcement on this piece of shit information floating around the internet. I’m NOT going to take pot shots at an artist’s personal palette but this is just misinformation to thousands of other people out there who may or may not know better.
Number one. IF YOU ARE PAINTING, YOU’RE NOT REFERENCING A DIGITAL SWATCH. So first of all, you need to know where paint comes from. I dont even know where to start with this. I mean seriously, the statement about not being able to make pure, strong colours with cadmiums is just so full of ignorance, I don’t even know where to start. 
If you need visual evidence, let’s take a look at this picture 
This picture was invented before CMYK ever came around, tbh. Too bad Klimt is dead or else he would attest to this just like EVERY OTHER TRADITIONAL PAINTER will. 
Mixing colours is not magic nor is it as easy as picking colours from a digital swatch. It takes practice to understand how certain colours react with one another, employ painting techniques such as not mixing white with every goddamn colour to lighten a hue. 
Let’s take another look at a somewhat LESS brightly painted piece.

The saturation is not nearly as bright but the chroma is pure. There are no muddy colours, nothing is brown where it was not meant to be. Because Kandinsky knows how to mix colours. It didn’t happen overnight nor was he born with that knowledge. It was years and years of practise and work.
Even Klee knew what was up. He was not a master artist by any means but he worked goddamn hard at it and look what he created.


Here’s another Klimt because we all love him so:

CMYK exists because it does not know how to replicate the natural pigments of paint that can reflect light. It’s a beautiful, beautiful fake at best. I love CMYK. I even want to get a tattoo that says CMYK. But it is by no means the one and only. 
So PLEASE. PLEASE EDUCATE YOURSELF AND CROSS REFERENCE YOUR COLOUR THEORY BEFORE YOU BUY INTO THIS GARBAGE. NEWTON KNEW WHAT HE WAS TALKING ABOUT WHEN HE MADE THE COLOUR WHEEL GUYS.
PAINTERS SPEAK OUT FOR OUR BELOVED COLOUR WHEEL! REBLOG AND REPOST! Whoo!
************************
EDIT// Additionally, I re-read that ignorant infographic or whatever and have come to realize that the artist classifies pthalo blue/green and hansa yellow as CMYK. That is not CMYK guys. CMYK is used for digital prints because you can’t use paint. Duh. God, that information is so wrong, it wasn’t even worth making this post.

metrikfire:

I would like to make a public service announcement on this piece of shit information floating around the internet. I’m NOT going to take pot shots at an artist’s personal palette but this is just misinformation to thousands of other people out there who may or may not know better.

Number one. IF YOU ARE PAINTING, YOU’RE NOT REFERENCING A DIGITAL SWATCH. So first of all, you need to know where paint comes from. I dont even know where to start with this. I mean seriously, the statement about not being able to make pure, strong colours with cadmiums is just so full of ignorance, I don’t even know where to start. 

If you need visual evidence, let’s take a look at this picture 

This picture was invented before CMYK ever came around, tbh. Too bad Klimt is dead or else he would attest to this just like EVERY OTHER TRADITIONAL PAINTER will. 

Mixing colours is not magic nor is it as easy as picking colours from a digital swatch. It takes practice to understand how certain colours react with one another, employ painting techniques such as not mixing white with every goddamn colour to lighten a hue. 

Let’s take another look at a somewhat LESS brightly painted piece.

The saturation is not nearly as bright but the chroma is pure. There are no muddy colours, nothing is brown where it was not meant to be. Because Kandinsky knows how to mix colours. It didn’t happen overnight nor was he born with that knowledge. It was years and years of practise and work.

Even Klee knew what was up. He was not a master artist by any means but he worked goddamn hard at it and look what he created.

Here’s another Klimt because we all love him so:

CMYK exists because it does not know how to replicate the natural pigments of paint that can reflect light. It’s a beautiful, beautiful fake at best. I love CMYK. I even want to get a tattoo that says CMYK. But it is by no means the one and only. 

So PLEASE. PLEASE EDUCATE YOURSELF AND CROSS REFERENCE YOUR COLOUR THEORY BEFORE YOU BUY INTO THIS GARBAGE. NEWTON KNEW WHAT HE WAS TALKING ABOUT WHEN HE MADE THE COLOUR WHEEL GUYS.

PAINTERS SPEAK OUT FOR OUR BELOVED COLOUR WHEEL! REBLOG AND REPOST! Whoo!

************************

EDIT// Additionally, I re-read that ignorant infographic or whatever and have come to realize that the artist classifies pthalo blue/green and hansa yellow as CMYK. That is not CMYK guys. CMYK is used for digital prints because you can’t use paint. Duh. God, that information is so wrong, it wasn’t even worth making this post.

(via windayy)

Filed under long posts art smackdowns queue

94,200 notes

hostduraravros:

positronmorbid:


ironychan:


greekceltic:


centaurcentral:


“A Centaur in Disguise” by Michelle Tolo


This is the most precious Centaur art I’ve ever seen.


What really makes it is the fact that the dude and the horse are both going “something here ain’t right…”


And I could see any hard core horse riding enthusiast going “What are you doing!?  That’s not how you ride!”


I guess he’s trying to blend in and not be the
centaur of attention

hostduraravros:

positronmorbid:

ironychan:

greekceltic:

centaurcentral:

“A Centaur in Disguise” by Michelle Tolo

This is the most precious Centaur art I’ve ever seen.

What really makes it is the fact that the dude and the horse are both going “something here ain’t right…”

And I could see any hard core horse riding enthusiast going “What are you doing!?  That’s not how you ride!”

I guess he’s trying to blend in and not be the

centaur of attention

(via demontoal)

Filed under art centaurs queue