The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged birds

12,891 notes

tamorapierce:

stormphyre:

paranoidgemsbok:

sweetguts:

cool-critters:

King of saxony bird-of-paradise (Pteridophora alberti)

The King of Saxony is a bird in the bird-of-paradise family (Paradisaeidae).  It is endemic to montane forest in New Guinea. The bird is sometimes referred to as “Kiss-a-ba” by the natives of Papua New Guinea and Western New Guinea, as a human interpretation of the male’s loud call. Adult males are territorial. The male guards its territory from perches placed in the tops of tall trees, and from these perches sings to compete with males in neighbouring territories. While singing, the male moves his occipital plumes about.

look it’s gabe

YOU MUST HEAR IT

I’m tired and read it as King of Sexy bird

Can you imagine one of these guys going through a revolving door?  Now two!  Now three!

Yeah, I’m in a mood.

(via koryos)

Filed under long posts birds king of saxony birds of paradise birds of paradise wildlife neato queue

1,041 notes

libutron:

Western Grey Plantain-eater - Crinifer piscator
The Western Grey Plantain-eater, scientifically named Crinifer piscator (Cuculiformes - Musophagidae), is a West African species whose call is one of the most familiar of this area.
Like all turacos, this one is strongly territorial. They can be seen in family groups for long time. The group may travel large distances to find abundant food source such as a particularly favoured fruiting tree. 
They are monogamous with strong pair-bonds. These birds display effusive greetings bowing their heads and spread their tail fan. Rituals also include mutual exchange of food and loud calls when they perch in the treetops.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Isidro Vila Verde | Locality: Abuko Reserve, Sara Job Kunda, Western, The Gambia (2007)

libutron:

Western Grey Plantain-eater - Crinifer piscator

The Western Grey Plantain-eater, scientifically named Crinifer piscator (Cuculiformes - Musophagidae), is a West African species whose call is one of the most familiar of this area.

Like all turacos, this one is strongly territorial. They can be seen in family groups for long time. The group may travel large distances to find abundant food source such as a particularly favoured fruiting tree. 

They are monogamous with strong pair-bonds. These birds display effusive greetings bowing their heads and spread their tail fan. Rituals also include mutual exchange of food and loud calls when they perch in the treetops.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Isidro Vila Verde | Locality: Abuko Reserve, Sara Job Kunda, Western, The Gambia (2007)

(via koryos)

Filed under western grey plantain eaters turacos birds wildlife queue

8,291 notes

abby-howard:

ANOTHER ANATOMY POST! Only three vertebrate groups have successfully evolved flight: Birds, Bats, and Pterosaurs, which are NOT dinosaurs, and are an extremely diverse group of reptiles! Pterodactyl is not the only one. However, birds ARE dinosaurs. Avian dinosaurs!

Wings are not some extra structure you tack on to a creature and somehow the arms go away— they ARE arms. Think about that when you are designing creatures with wings and also giving them arms. That means your creature has six limbs.

Next anatomy post: The anatomy and evolution of DRAGONS. If you guys have any requests, feel free to send them in!

(via light-of-aether)

Filed under anatomy sharovipteryx prehistoric life pterosaurs dinosaurs birds humans queue

2,696 notes

koryos:

wnycradiolab:

liketinyhorses:

malformalady:

The Gouldian finch are small, brightly colored birds with green backs, yellow bellies, and purple breasts  with a light blue uppertail and a cream undertail. Sometimes called lady gouldians, their facial color can vary, but black is the most common. Gouldian finch chicks are equipped with blue phosphorescent beads along their mouths, making it easy for the parents to feed them in the darkness of the nest cavity.
Photo credit: Greg Grall/National Aquarium

WHAT.

WHAT indeed.

99.999% chance that this species has a problem with brood parasitism. Especially with that intricately patterned palate. Also, those bright beads don’t just help parents see the chicks- they actually help the chicks compete with one another to get the most food from mom and dad. The flashier the mouth, the more attention they receive.

koryos:

wnycradiolab:

liketinyhorses:

malformalady:

The Gouldian finch are small, brightly colored birds with green backs, yellow bellies, and purple breasts  with a light blue uppertail and a cream undertail. Sometimes called lady gouldians, their facial color can vary, but black is the most common. Gouldian finch chicks are equipped with blue phosphorescent beads along their mouths, making it easy for the parents to feed them in the darkness of the nest cavity.

Photo credit: Greg Grall/National Aquarium

WHAT.

WHAT indeed.

99.999% chance that this species has a problem with brood parasitism. Especially with that intricately patterned palate. Also, those bright beads don’t just help parents see the chicks- they actually help the chicks compete with one another to get the most food from mom and dad. The flashier the mouth, the more attention they receive.

Filed under birds wildlife gouldian finches babies finches science chicks queue

8,084 notes

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.
The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so evolution has come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

becausebirds:

This GIF shows how the toucan releases heat using its beak to cool itself off.

The toucan beak isn’t just beautiful, it’s also an adjustable thermal radiator that the bird uses to warm and cool itself. When the bird is hot, the blood vessels in their beak open up to allow more circulation to enable heat to escape. Birds can’t sweat so evolution has come up with some life hacks to get the job done. [video]

(via theazuredolphin)

Filed under birds toucans gif neato queue

187 notes

rhamphotheca:

Dinosaurs shrank for 50 million years to become birds
by Andy Coghlan
It took 50 million years of continual shrinking to turn massive, lumbering dinosaurs into the first small flying birds.
"No other dinosaur group has undergone such a long and extended period of miniaturisation," says Mike Lee of the South Australian Museum in Adelaide. “Statistically this trend was far stronger than by chance, analogous to flipping a coin a dozen times and getting all heads.”
Lee and his colleagues have performed the most comprehensive analysis yet of fossil theropods, the two-footed meat-eating dinosaurs, like Velociraptor, from which birds evolved. They have charted how 224-million-year-old dinosaurs weighing 238 kilograms evolved into proto-birds, including Archaeopteryx, that weighed just 0.8 kg.
The analysis reveals that the ancestors of birds shrank without interruption. “What was impressive was the consistency of the size change along the dinosaur-to-bird transition, with every descendant smaller than its ancestor,” says Lee. Getting smaller must have offered advantages at every turn…
(read more: New Scientist)
illustration by Davide Bonnadonna

rhamphotheca:

Dinosaurs shrank for 50 million years to become birds

by Andy Coghlan

It took 50 million years of continual shrinking to turn massive, lumbering dinosaurs into the first small flying birds.

"No other dinosaur group has undergone such a long and extended period of miniaturisation," says Mike Lee of the South Australian Museum in Adelaide. “Statistically this trend was far stronger than by chance, analogous to flipping a coin a dozen times and getting all heads.”

Lee and his colleagues have performed the most comprehensive analysis yet of fossil theropods, the two-footed meat-eating dinosaurs, like Velociraptor, from which birds evolved. They have charted how 224-million-year-old dinosaurs weighing 238 kilograms evolved into proto-birds, including Archaeopteryx, that weighed just 0.8 kg.

The analysis reveals that the ancestors of birds shrank without interruption. “What was impressive was the consistency of the size change along the dinosaur-to-bird transition, with every descendant smaller than its ancestor,” says Lee. Getting smaller must have offered advantages at every turn…

(read more: New Scientist)

illustration by Davide Bonnadonna

(via prehistoric-birds)

Filed under neato birds dinosaurs prehistoric life queue