The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged birds

8,539 notes

Anonymous asked: Have you heard of the sooty owl? They are frightening and their eyes are probably hell portals.

iguanamouth:

i DID actually while i was looking up owls a while back oh MAN they have incredible faces, like some kinda confused ghost who ended up in a bird and now just has to live with it

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looks like they come in lesser and greater sooty flavors, and theyre both pretty similar except for their sizes (about 43 cm for the greater, 37 for the lesser)

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theyre like someone took a barn owl and just lowered the brightness, threw some speckles in there, made their eyes a direct portal to the infinite nightmarish abyss, called it a day

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the YOUNG SOOTY OWLS on the other hand dont even look like real animals. they look like someone made a dodo out of felt and accidentally left it in a dryer. owls are great

(photos from x  x  x)

Filed under sooty owls birds wildlife neato babies chicks queue owls

2,294 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Wire-crested Thorntail (Discosura popelairii)
…a rare and striking species of hummingbird which occurs in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Where it inhabits solely inhabits lowland forests, and is not tolerant of secondary habitats. Like most striking plumaged birds wire-crested thorntails are sexually dimorphic with lacking the long “wire” crests and “thorn” tails of males. In typical humming bird fashion wire-crested thorntails feed on nectar from flowers, but will occasionally take insects as well. 
Currently Discosura popelairii is listed as near threatened by the IUCN, as it faces accelerating threats from deforestation in the Amazon Basin. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Apodiformes-Trochilidae-Discosura-D. popelairii
Image: Bill Bouton

astronomy-to-zoology:

Wire-crested Thorntail (Discosura popelairii)

…a rare and striking species of hummingbird which occurs in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Where it inhabits solely inhabits lowland forests, and is not tolerant of secondary habitats. Like most striking plumaged birds wire-crested thorntails are sexually dimorphic with lacking the long “wire” crests and “thorn” tails of males. In typical humming bird fashion wire-crested thorntails feed on nectar from flowers, but will occasionally take insects as well. 

Currently Discosura popelairii is listed as near threatened by the IUCN, as it faces accelerating threats from deforestation in the Amazon Basin. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Apodiformes-Trochilidae-Discosura-D. popelairii

Image: Bill Bouton

(via koryos)

Filed under birds wire crested thorntail wildlife hummingbirds queue

281 notes

koryos:

Sometimes you are compelled by the science gods to make a photoset of the long-whiskered owlet (Xenoglaux loweryi), a fanciful creature that probably belongs at a masquerade somewhere.

Rare, tiny (14 cm, less than 50 g), and nearly flightless, this little fellow can be found in forests of Abra Patricia in northern Peru. It has a froglike call and may eat insects, though no one has yet actually observed it eating. My guess is that it lives on stardust and David Bowie songs.

(Photos by Dubi Shapiro, Gunnar, Adam Riley, and Shachar Alterman, respectively.)

Filed under long whiskered owls owls birds wildlife queue