The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged deer

139 notes

rhamphotheca:

White-tailed Deer grow new antlers every year. 
They grow from bony bases on the skull called peduncles, and are themselves bone. As they’re growing, they are soft and receive a rich blood supply through the velvet covering. Deer antlers are among the fastest-growing tissues in the animal kingdom, growing by up to 2 inches (5 cm) a week during peak growth in the summer. By late August or September the blood supply is cut off and the velvet is shed, usually within about 24 hours. 
The antlers’ primary purpose is in jousts between males to establish dominance during breeding season, but they are also an indicator of the physical condition of the male. Antlers are not strongly correlated to age - you can’t count the points and tell how old a deer is - though peak size usually occurs between 5-8 years old. Instead, antler size is mainly determined by genetics and the nutrition of the deer’s diet as they’re growing; a bigger rack usually indicates a healthier deer, at least within its age group. 
The antlers have no big advantage outside of the mating season, and the extra weight and size can be energetically costly, so by mid-winter, as a result of dropping testosterone levels, the joint between the antler and the peduncle weakens and the antler is shed. Male deer are antler-less for 3-4 months of the year, until new ones begin growing again in spring.photograph: USDA/Scott Bauer
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

White-tailed Deer grow new antlers every year.

They grow from bony bases on the skull called peduncles, and are themselves bone. As they’re growing, they are soft and receive a rich blood supply through the velvet covering. Deer antlers are among the fastest-growing tissues in the animal kingdom, growing by up to 2 inches (5 cm) a week during peak growth in the summer. By late August or September the blood supply is cut off and the velvet is shed, usually within about 24 hours.

The antlers’ primary purpose is in jousts between males to establish dominance during breeding season, but they are also an indicator of the physical condition of the male. Antlers are not strongly correlated to age - you can’t count the points and tell how old a deer is - though peak size usually occurs between 5-8 years old. Instead, antler size is mainly determined by genetics and the nutrition of the deer’s diet as they’re growing; a bigger rack usually indicates a healthier deer, at least within its age group.

The antlers have no big advantage outside of the mating season, and the extra weight and size can be energetically costly, so by mid-winter, as a result of dropping testosterone levels, the joint between the antler and the peduncle weakens and the antler is shed. Male deer are antler-less for 3-4 months of the year, until new ones begin growing again in spring.

photograph:
USDA/Scott Bauer

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Filed under deer whitetail deer wildlife queue

156 notes

rhamphotheca:

Alaska National Parks
Caribou spring into migration early, following a warm winter. The Western Arctic Herd’s spring migration to the calving grounds is 1-3 weeks earlier than in previous years, after Western Alaska’s incredibly warm winter (6-8° F warmer than average). NPS tracks timing of caribou migration and investigates how weather affects this herd’s amazing, annual journey. 
For more information visit: 
National Park Service - Nature 
and National Park Service - Caribou

rhamphotheca:

Caribou spring into migration early, following a warm winter. The Western Arctic Herd’s spring migration to the calving grounds is 1-3 weeks earlier than in previous years, after Western Alaska’s incredibly warm winter (6-8° F warmer than average). NPS tracks timing of caribou migration and investigates how weather affects this herd’s amazing, annual journey.

For more information visit:

National Park Service - Nature

and National Park Service - Caribou

Filed under caribou wildlife deer

7,975 notes

archiemcphee:

If Cerberus, the three-headed dog, guards the entrance to Hades, what do you suppose a three-headed deer is the guardian of? This awesome image of three fallow deer bucks, standing in a perfect row and looking backward at the same moment, was captured in the forests of Lithuania by photographer Renatas Jakaitis. But we prefer to think this photo was taken on the outskirts of the Forbidden Forest.
[via Twisted Sifter]

archiemcphee:

If Cerberus, the three-headed dog, guards the entrance to Hades, what do you suppose a three-headed deer is the guardian of? This awesome image of three fallow deer bucks, standing in a perfect row and looking backward at the same moment, was captured in the forests of Lithuania by photographer Renatas Jakaitis. But we prefer to think this photo was taken on the outskirts of the Forbidden Forest.

[via Twisted Sifter]

Filed under neato oh dear wildlife fallow deer deer queue

324 notes

rhamphotheca:

A one-month old baby Pudu deer (Pudu sp.) is fed at a college in Concepcion city, south of Santiago, Chile, on November 12, 2012. The Pudu, the world’s smallest species of deer, was found orphaned in a forest close to Concepcion and lives exclusively in southern Chile and part of Argentina. Because of overhunting and habitat loss due to agriculture and livestock, the species is currently considered vulnerable.
(photo: Jose Luis Saavedra/Reuters)       (via: TakePart.org)

rhamphotheca:

A one-month old baby Pudu deer (Pudu sp.) is fed at a college in Concepcion city, south of Santiago, Chile, on November 12, 2012. The Pudu, the world’s smallest species of deer, was found orphaned in a forest close to Concepcion and lives exclusively in southern Chile and part of Argentina. Because of overhunting and habitat loss due to agriculture and livestock, the species is currently considered vulnerable.

(photo: Jose Luis Saavedra/Reuters)       (via: TakePart.org)

Filed under pudu deer babies wildlife