The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged dogs

173,087 notes

thefuuuucomics:

huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP

The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.

Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.

cryinggggg

(via theazuredolphin)

Filed under pets dogs canines gif gifset long posts queue

89 notes

chimerachic asked: I told my dad that his methods of training the dog by pinning and hitting it to prove himself the "Alpha"was wrong, because you said that Alpha males and the traditional hierarchy was an outdated myth. He refused to listen, saying that he'd seen the same violent pecking order behavior in stable horses as well as dogs. If it isn't dominance, what is it?

koryos:

It’s strangely difficult to convince people like your father that these methods are wrong, especially if he’s gone so far as to pin/strike your dog already. You may not be able to convince him of anything.

(Also, using horse behavior to explain dog behavior is very silly, so we’re just going to ignore that bit.)

It’s better to think of dominance as a relationship context than something that is enforced. It’s not that it doesn’t exist, it’s just that you can’t always assume that certain actions mean that it does. Aggression can just be plain old aggression- in fact, most aggression takes place in canids before a dominance relationship is established. The point of the dominance relationship is to stop fighting and reduce the danger of injury. This is why posturing takes the place of actual violence.

I wrote in an article about how submissive behaviors in canids are generally not forced by others- instead, they are willingly offered. Wolves and dogs usually don’t force their peers to roll over (and they certainly can’t grab each other with their hands to make it happen!), which is what makes the whole “alpha roll” thing so patently ridiculous. Furthermore, active submission is far more common than active dominance in canid groups, even groups that are fragmented and unrelated with each other.

The other thing to consider is the fact that your father is not a dog. It surprises me how often people believe that dogs think humans are big dogs. Shouldn’t the fact that many dogs behave so differently with humans than they do with other dogs tell us that they are capable of forming these separate categories? By virtue of your species, you are going to have a different relationship with your dog than your dog has with another dog. And dogs are certainly capable of recognizing these differences themselves.

You and your dog aren’t even usually going after the same resources- you don’t HAVE to be dominant over your dog! And even if your relationship does fall that way, your actions are never ever going to be the actions of another dog. They’re just not. You would never in a million years be able to communicate on the scent/visual/auditory level that dogs do with each other. So stop trying to be a dog and act like a human.

…That came out a little harsher than I intended. Sorry. Buildup of frustration.Basically: there’s a poor understanding of dog/dog relationships out there in general media, but even worse is the idea that dog/human relationships should be modeled after dog/dog relationships.

Filed under animal abuse cw dogs dominance theory reasons the dog whisperer is full of shit canines pets long posts queue

267 notes

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)
I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.
If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)
Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.
I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.
We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.
I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.
Read more…

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)

I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.

If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)

Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.

I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.

We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.

I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.

Read more…

Filed under koryos grossout canines animal behaviour dogs pets wildlife

114,459 notes

camembertlylegal:

deadlydinos:

Once I was walking home with some law school friends and they were like ”Why are you walking up that street your street is like three more streets up”

"Yeah but there’s a house on this street and sometimes their golden retriever naps in the sun on the sidewalk and I like to give him belly rubs"

Now all the law students walk up belly rub lane because law school is stressful and dogs rock

I bet that is the happiest dog

(via theazuredolphin)

Filed under pets canines dogs queue

76 notes

Can Playing Tug-of-War Make a Dog Dominant? A Scientific Study Dispels the Myth

allthisfrost:

I kid you not, the Barbara Woodhouse-style, your-dog-lives-to-dominate-you “professionals” on Cesar Millan’s website state, “To prevent a puppy from growing up to be a rough-playing or aggressive dog, you should never play “tug-of-war” or other dominance type games with them…” and later on assert, “For dogs, playing is primarily about exerting dominance over another dog, toy, or person.” Can we please rethink these outdated notions and take a look at rapidly advancing science that tells us otherwise? 

(via koryos)

Filed under reasons the dog whisperer is full of shit canines dogs pets queue