The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged dogs

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thejunglenook:


Scent of the familiar: You may linger like perfume in your dog’s brain
An area of the canine brain associated with reward responds more strongly to the scents of familiar humans than it does to the scents of other humans, or even to those of familiar dogs.
The journal Behavioural Processes published the results of the first brain-imaging study of dogs responding to biological odors. The research was led by Gregory Berns, director of Emory’s Center for Neuropolicy.
"It’s one thing when you come home and your dog sees you and jumps on you and licks you and knows that good things are about to happen," Berns says. "In our experiment, however, the scent donors were not physically present. That means the canine brain responses were being triggered by something distant in space and time. It shows that dogs’ brains have these mental representations of us that persist when we’re not there."
When humans smell the perfume or cologne of someone they love, they may have an immediate, emotional reaction that’s not necessarily cognitive, Berns notes. “Our experiment may be showing the same process in dogs. But since dogs are so much more olfactory than humans, their responses would likely be even more powerful than the ones we might have.”
In 2012, Berns led the team that captured the first brain images of alert, unrestrained dogs, using harmless functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), setting the stage for exploring the neural biology and cognitive processes of man’s best friend. He has shown that dogs have a positive response in the caudate region of the brain when given a hand signal indicating they would receive a food treat, as compared to a different hand signal for “no treat.” In humans, the caudate region is associated with decision-making, motivation and processing emotions…
"Olfaction is believed to be dogs’ most powerful and perhaps important sense, making it an obvious place to explore canine social cognition," Spivak says.
The experiment involved 12 dogs of various breeds. The animals had all undergone training to hold perfectly still while undergoing an fMRI scan. As they were being scanned, the subjects were presented with five different scents that had been collected on sterile gauze pads that morning and sealed in Mylar envelopes. The scent samples came from the subject itself, a dog the subject had never met, a dog that lived in the subject’s household, a human the dog had never met, and a human that lived in the subject’s household…
The results showed that all five scents elicited a similar response in parts of the dogs’ brains involved in detecting smells, the olfactory bulb and peduncle. The caudate responses, however, were significantly stronger for the scents of familiar humans, followed by that of familiar dogs.
"The stronger caudate activation suggested that not only did the dogs discriminate the familiar human scent from the others, they had a positive association with it," Berns says. “While we might expect that dogs should be highly tuned to the smell of other dogs, it seems that the ‘reward response’ is reserved for their humans. Whether this is based on food, play, innate genetic predisposition or something else remains an area for future investigation.”
An interesting twist: The dogs in the experiment that had received training as service/therapy dogs showed greater caudate activation for the scent of a familiar human compared with the other dogs. It is unclear whether this difference was due to genetics or had simply been fostered through the service/therapy training. (continue reading)
 

Journal Reference: Gregory S. Berns, Andrew M. Brooks, Mark Spivak. Scent of the familiar: An fMRI study of canine brain responses to familiar and unfamiliar human and dog odors. Behavioural Processes, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.beproc.2014.02.011 (x)

thejunglenook:

Scent of the familiar: You may linger like perfume in your dog’s brain

An area of the canine brain associated with reward responds more strongly to the scents of familiar humans than it does to the scents of other humans, or even to those of familiar dogs.

The journal Behavioural Processes published the results of the first brain-imaging study of dogs responding to biological odors. The research was led by Gregory Berns, director of Emory’s Center for Neuropolicy.

"It’s one thing when you come home and your dog sees you and jumps on you and licks you and knows that good things are about to happen," Berns says. "In our experiment, however, the scent donors were not physically present. That means the canine brain responses were being triggered by something distant in space and time. It shows that dogs’ brains have these mental representations of us that persist when we’re not there."

When humans smell the perfume or cologne of someone they love, they may have an immediate, emotional reaction that’s not necessarily cognitive, Berns notes. “Our experiment may be showing the same process in dogs. But since dogs are so much more olfactory than humans, their responses would likely be even more powerful than the ones we might have.”

In 2012, Berns led the team that captured the first brain images of alert, unrestrained dogs, using harmless functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), setting the stage for exploring the neural biology and cognitive processes of man’s best friend. He has shown that dogs have a positive response in the caudate region of the brain when given a hand signal indicating they would receive a food treat, as compared to a different hand signal for “no treat.” In humans, the caudate region is associated with decision-making, motivation and processing emotions

"Olfaction is believed to be dogs’ most powerful and perhaps important sense, making it an obvious place to explore canine social cognition," Spivak says.

The experiment involved 12 dogs of various breeds. The animals had all undergone training to hold perfectly still while undergoing an fMRI scan. As they were being scanned, the subjects were presented with five different scents that had been collected on sterile gauze pads that morning and sealed in Mylar envelopes. The scent samples came from the subject itself, a dog the subject had never met, a dog that lived in the subject’s household, a human the dog had never met, and a human that lived in the subject’s household…

The results showed that all five scents elicited a similar response in parts of the dogs’ brains involved in detecting smells, the olfactory bulb and peduncle. The caudate responses, however, were significantly stronger for the scents of familiar humans, followed by that of familiar dogs.

"The stronger caudate activation suggested that not only did the dogs discriminate the familiar human scent from the others, they had a positive association with it," Berns says. “While we might expect that dogs should be highly tuned to the smell of other dogs, it seems that the ‘reward response’ is reserved for their humans. Whether this is based on food, play, innate genetic predisposition or something else remains an area for future investigation.”

An interesting twist: The dogs in the experiment that had received training as service/therapy dogs showed greater caudate activation for the scent of a familiar human compared with the other dogs. It is unclear whether this difference was due to genetics or had simply been fostered through the service/therapy training. (continue reading)

 

Journal Reference:

Gregory S. Berns, Andrew M. Brooks, Mark Spivak. Scent of the familiar: An fMRI study of canine brain responses to familiar and unfamiliar human and dog odors. Behavioural Processes, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.beproc.2014.02.011 (x)

(via koryos)

Filed under long posts canines dogs pets queue

82,435 notes

tmirai:

constellation-funk:

careydraws:

Written in the Bones. New comic, written by Christopher M. Jones & illustrated by Carey Pietsch.

I’m hoping to have printed copies of this at MOCCA, ABPCC, and TCAF this spring, and SPX in the fall! More info to come.

Me and Carey worked really hard on this comic; if you got something from it I’d love for you to reblog it, and maybe even buy a copy from Carey when she’s in town or even if she’s not. Thanks so much for reading. 

Oh man that was beautiful and so touching and sad. Gorgeous storytelling.

(via vixxey)

Filed under long posts written in the bones dogs canines pets sads animal death queue animal abuse

19,569 notes

Anonymous asked: PIT BULLS ARE EVIL AND YOURE STUPID FOR THINKING THEYRE NOT

miosisfr:

epicpenguindinosaurs:

b-fluff:

earthandanimals:

thebendbecomesthebreak:

OH YES

LOOK AT 

THIS EVIL CREATURE

THEYRE NOT NICE 

AT ALL

Pit bulls are not born mean or cruel or vicious. It’s the humans that abuse and mistreat them that make them that way. 

Signal boost!

Too fucking right!!! 

More people need to understand that. Animals are not inherently evil, and do not deserve the reputation they’ve been given because of having terrible humans.

Remember how pit bulls were originally used to protect small kids? Because yeah, that was a thing. Even pit bulls used for dog fights almost always show no aggression towards humans, and many learn to accept other dogs after proper rehabilitation. Any dog might be violent toward other dogs if not socialized at a young age anyway. 

Filed under long posts pibbles canines pets dogs gif queue