The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged lizards

184 notes

reptilefacts:

allaboutreptiles: The Asian grass lizard, six-striped long-tailed lizard, or long-tailed grass lizard (Takydromus sexlineatus)


This is the lizard with the super long tail!The tail length is usually over three times the body (snout to vent) length in this species. And much like geckos they can drop their tail when they feel threatened.
They typically live in countries such as India, China, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysian Peninsula, and Indonesia.
The Long Tailed grass lizard is easily recognized by the long tail. It has a white to cream coloured underbelly with a brown or beige back, often adorned with brown stripes of different shades.They typically eat small insects such as flies, in captivity they can be reared on crickets
These are entirely diurnal lizards that emerge in the early morning to bask in the sun. If a potential predator approaches they will first remain completely still, and then if the danger persists, they will flee to the safety of foliage.They also have communicate with each other through various waves…how cute



If someone sat down to draw that thing so many people would yell at them for being a crappy artist holy shit

reptilefacts:

allaboutreptiles: The Asian grass lizard, six-striped long-tailed lizard, or long-tailed grass lizard (Takydromus sexlineatus)

This is the lizard with the super long tail!
The tail length is usually over three times the body (snout to vent) length in this species. And much like geckos they can drop their tail when they feel threatened.

They typically live in countries such as India, China, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysian Peninsula, and Indonesia.

The Long Tailed grass lizard is easily recognized by the long tail. It has a white to cream coloured underbelly with a brown or beige back, often adorned with brown stripes of different shades.
They typically eat small insects such as flies, in captivity they can be reared on crickets

These are entirely diurnal lizards that emerge in the early morning to bask in the sun. If a potential predator approaches they will first remain completely still, and then if the danger persists, they will flee to the safety of foliage.
They also have communicate with each other through various waves…how cute

If someone sat down to draw that thing so many people would yell at them for being a crappy artist holy shit

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under long tailed grass lizards wildlife lizards queue

59,356 notes

iwilleatyourenglish:

iwilleatyourenglish:

sometimes, when life gets particularly sad or hard, i remind myself that my leopard gecko begs at the glass when i’m ripping paper towels and then runs to the top of his log in anticipation of me putting a bit there because he likes to spoon with it

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someone wanted to see what he looks like when i’m about to give him the paper towel

behold a baby lizard attempting to contain a joy too large for his tiny body

(via theazuredolphin)

Filed under pets lizards leopard geckos so cute it hurts geckos

605 notes

bogleech:

goth-cowboy:

bogleech:

aviculor:

WAIT A SECOND

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OH MY GOD

Phrynocephalus mystaceus, the toad-headed Agama.

The frills are actually the corners of its mouth. It’s hard to say whether or not Helioptile was intended to resemble it or accidentally did in the process of stylizing a frilled dragon:

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Wait, those are MOUTH frills? Holy shit that’s cool

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Yeah!

I could see a grass/dragon flower-lizard here.

Filed under pokemon toad headed agamas agamas lizards helioptile frilled dragons gif queue long posts

377 notes

rhamphotheca:

NY Times:  Coldblooded Does Not Mean Stupid
by Emily Anthes
In the plethora of research over the past few decades on the cognitive capabilities of various species, lizards, turtles and snakes have been left in the back of the class. Few scientists bothered to peer into the reptile mind, and those who did were largely unimpressed.
“Reptiles don’t really have great press,” said Gordon M. Burghardt, a comparative psychologist at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. “Certainly in the past, people didn’t really think too much of their intelligence. They were thought of as instinct machines.”
But now that is beginning to change, thanks to a growing interest in “coldblooded cognition” and recent studies revealing that reptile brains are not as primitive as we imagined. The research could not only redeem reptiles but also shed new light on cognitive evolution.
Because reptiles, birds and mammals diverged so long ago, with a common ancestor that lived 280 million years ago, the emerging data suggest that certain sophisticated mental skills may be more ancient than had been assumed — or so adaptive that they evolved multiple times…
(read more)
photograph: Manuel Leal

rhamphotheca:

NY Times:  Coldblooded Does Not Mean Stupid

by Emily Anthes

In the plethora of research over the past few decades on the cognitive capabilities of various species, lizards, turtles and snakes have been left in the back of the class. Few scientists bothered to peer into the reptile mind, and those who did were largely unimpressed.

“Reptiles don’t really have great press,” said Gordon M. Burghardt, a comparative psychologist at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. “Certainly in the past, people didn’t really think too much of their intelligence. They were thought of as instinct machines.”

But now that is beginning to change, thanks to a growing interest in “coldblooded cognition” and recent studies revealing that reptile brains are not as primitive as we imagined. The research could not only redeem reptiles but also shed new light on cognitive evolution.

Because reptiles, birds and mammals diverged so long ago, with a common ancestor that lived 280 million years ago, the emerging data suggest that certain sophisticated mental skills may be more ancient than had been assumed — or so adaptive that they evolved multiple times…

(read more)

photograph: Manuel Leal

Filed under animal intelligence animal death predation science live feeding red footed tortoises tortoises anoles lizards monitor lizards queue