The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged marine life

587 notes

trynottodrown:

Skulls of Marine Mammals (L to R)

  1. Bottlenose Dolphin - Tursiops truncatus
  2. Orca - Orcinus orca
  3. Dugong - Dugong Dugon
  4. West Indian Manatee - Trichechus manatus
  5. Steller’s Sea Cow - Hydromalis gigas
  6. Dwarf Sperm Whale - Kogia sima
  7. California Sea Lion - Zalophus californiaus
  8. Hooker’s Sea Lion- Phocarctos hookeri
  9. Minke Whale - Balaenoptera acutorostrata
  10. Crab Eater Seal - Lobodon carinophagus

(via theoceanisourhome)

Filed under skulls death animal death marine life wildlife cetaceans sirenians pinnipeds dolphins whales bottlenose dolphins orcas dugongs west indian manatees steller's sea cows dwarf sperm whales california sea lions hooker's sea lions minke whales crab eater seals seals sea lions manatees tags longer than post queue

981 notes

biologicalmarginalia:

theladyshark:

You see pictures of Great whites breaching all the time. But they are not the only shark that breaches you know.

Here are some awesome pictures of the Basking shark breaching. A rare sight!

This is great… but there really needs to be attribution to the photographers!

First photograph — Anthony Robson

Second photograph — Wild Light Photography

Third photograph — Susan Brigden/Explore Mull

Fourth photograph — Stiofan O’Connor/Pelagic Shark Research Foundation

Filed under basking sharks fish marine life wildlife elasmobranchii breaching queue

315 notes

thelonelywhale:

As a paleo-artist, one of my biggest pet peeves are prehistoric whales reconstructed not as whales but as sinewy, snarling, shrink-wrapped marine reptiles. It’s just not a plausible reconstruction, even if it’s highly speculative, and it paints an incorrect image in the public eye. Granted, this is a struggle I’ve exlpored in all forms of paleo-art and reconstructive illustration. But the whales have really been getting to me recently.
Here are some recontructions of Basilosaurus, if you don’t know what I mean (one by Karen Carr, the other by an artist I could not determine):


These snakey, reptilious reconstructions may stem from the fact that Basilosaurus, one of the first early cetaceans to be found, was believed to be a reptile when first discovered (hence the name). Maybe we simply haven’t fully shaken that mindset.
But still! Even the damn Smithsonian, which has such a wonderful collection of ancient cetaceans, is at fault in this:

Don’t even get me started on their recently-closed dinosaur hall. Thank the lord they’re finally renovating that dated piece of crap.
I have struggled to find a way to reconstruct these animals so that they are just a little bit more believeable. Up top I’ve done a really really quick sketch of Dorudon. I tried to not only make its body more streamlined and whale-like (because Dorudon has a lovely, almost but not quite modern-looking skeleton), but I also tried to give it markings similar to what we find on modern cetaceans for camouflage. Because hey, who’s to say they didn’t have ‘em? I tried to make them familiar but not directly copied from any modern species.
Aaaaand end rant.

thelonelywhale:

As a paleo-artist, one of my biggest pet peeves are prehistoric whales reconstructed not as whales but as sinewy, snarling, shrink-wrapped marine reptiles. It’s just not a plausible reconstruction, even if it’s highly speculative, and it paints an incorrect image in the public eye. Granted, this is a struggle I’ve exlpored in all forms of paleo-art and reconstructive illustration. But the whales have really been getting to me recently.

Here are some recontructions of Basilosaurus, if you don’t know what I mean (one by Karen Carr, the other by an artist I could not determine):

These snakey, reptilious reconstructions may stem from the fact that Basilosaurus, one of the first early cetaceans to be found, was believed to be a reptile when first discovered (hence the name). Maybe we simply haven’t fully shaken that mindset.

But still! Even the damn Smithsonian, which has such a wonderful collection of ancient cetaceans, is at fault in this:

Don’t even get me started on their recently-closed dinosaur hall. Thank the lord they’re finally renovating that dated piece of crap.

I have struggled to find a way to reconstruct these animals so that they are just a little bit more believeable. Up top I’ve done a really really quick sketch of Dorudon. I tried to not only make its body more streamlined and whale-like (because Dorudon has a lovely, almost but not quite modern-looking skeleton), but I also tried to give it markings similar to what we find on modern cetaceans for camouflage. Because hey, who’s to say they didn’t have ‘em? I tried to make them familiar but not directly copied from any modern species.

Aaaaand end rant.

(via derangedhyena-delphinidae)

Filed under long posts marine life cetaceans basilosaurus dorudon prehistoric life queue

100 notes

endcetaceanexploitation:

blackfishsound:

via Orca Research Trust:

Today, at 11am Dr Ingrid Visser received a call from Bob Brook that he and his crew had found an orca entangled in a cray pot line. He remained with the orca for the two hours it took for Steve Hathaway, Dan Godoy and Ingrid to arrive on the scene. Keeping the orca afloat were other members of its pod, including its presumed calf. Ingrid has identified the orca as Dian, named after the famous gorilla researcher, Dian Fossey. Dian the orca was entangled in a line approximately 40 m long, attached to a ‘pot’ used for catching crayfish. The pot was weighted with concrete blocks of about 35 kg. Dian remained calm during the disentanglement and she was successfully released and followed for a number of kilometres afterwards, to ensure that she was ok and remained with the other orca. If you see orca in NZ waters please call 0800 SEE ORCA. Thank you to everyone who helped save her and good luck out there Dian!


Happy ending :)

endcetaceanexploitation:

blackfishsound:

via Orca Research Trust:

Today, at 11am Dr Ingrid Visser received a call from Bob Brook that he and his crew had found an orca entangled in a cray pot line. He remained with the orca for the two hours it took for Steve Hathaway, Dan Godoy and Ingrid to arrive on the scene. Keeping the orca afloat were other members of its pod, including its presumed calf. Ingrid has identified the orca as Dian, named after the famous gorilla researcher, Dian Fossey. Dian the orca was entangled in a line approximately 40 m long, attached to a ‘pot’ used for catching crayfish. The pot was weighted with concrete blocks of about 35 kg. Dian remained calm during the disentanglement and she was successfully released and followed for a number of kilometres afterwards, to ensure that she was ok and remained with the other orca. If you see orca in NZ waters please call 0800 SEE ORCA. Thank you to everyone who helped save her and good luck out there Dian!

Happy ending :)

Filed under orcas new zealand orcas ingrid visser happy marine life wildlife dolphins cetaceans long posts queue

671 notes

cool-critters:

Common remora (Remora remora)

The common remora is a pelagic marine fish belonging to family Echeneidae. The common remora is different from other remoras in the family Echeneidae by the modification of its dorsal fin. The dorsal fin, which has 22 to 26 soft rays, acts as a suction cup, creating a vacuum to allow it to attach to larger marine animals, such as whales, dolphins, sharks, and sea turtles. This species can reach 86.4 cm (34.0 in) in total length, though most do not exceed 40 cm (16 in). This species does not seem to have a negative effect on its host. The host provides the remora with fast-moving water to bathe its gills, a steady flow of food, transportation, and protection. The common remora’s attachment to one host can last for up to three months. During this time, the remora can move its attachment site if it feels threatened. The common remora cannot survive in still water; it needs water flow over its gills to provide it oxygen. This remora is commonly found in warm marine waters and have been seen in the western Mediterranean and the Atlantic, as well as the North Sea.

photo credits: rling, hypescience, richard ling, divebums

(via koryos)

Filed under common remoras remoras wildlife fish marine life queue