The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged marine life

181 notes

rhamphotheca:

Pelagic parenting: A deep-sea squid broods its eggs

Reproduction is one of the many challenges faced by deep-sea animals. In recent years, submersibles have allowed scientists to explore the lives of deep-sea animals in ways that were not possible before.

One of the many exciting discoveries was that a mother of the deep-sea squid species Gonatus onyx broods her eggs by holding them in her arms, a behavior that had never been previously reported for squids. This shocking discovery was the first time scientists had evidence of parental care in squids.

In 2012, a team of researchers led by Stephanie Bush, reported finding another species of deep-sea squid that broods eggs, Bathyteuthis berryi, suggesting that this form of parental care may be a common solution to a reproductive problem for deep-sea squids.

Publication:
Bush, S. L., Hoving, H. J. T., Huffard, C. L., Robison, B. R., & L. D. Zeidberg. 2012. Brooding and sperm storage by the deep-sea squid Bathyteuthis berryi (Cephalopoda: Decapodiformes). Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. 92(7):1629-1636.

(via: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

Filed under neato marine life wildlife squid deep sea life gonatus onyx bathyteuthis berryi

724 notes

libutron:

Bat Ray | ©divindk   (Channel Islands National Park, California, US)
Myliobatis californica (Myliobatidae), better known as Bat Ray or Bat Eagle Ray, is commonly found in sandy and muddy bays and sloughs, also on rocky bottom and in kelp beds, along the coastal waters of the eastern Pacific, from central Oregon in the US to the Gulf of California in Mexico, and in the Galapagos Islands [1]. 
Bat rays are commonly distinguished from other rays because of their distinct, protruding head and large eyes. They have a flat body with a dorsal fin at the base of the tail. The tail is whiplike and can be as long or longer than the width of the body. It is armed with a barbed stinger that is venomous. Bat rays are named for their two long pectoral fins that are shaped like the wings of a bat [2].
Like other ray species, bat rays appear to migrate from inshore waters during the colder months of the year, and return to the same localities year after year [3].

libutron:

Bat Ray | ©divindk   (Channel Islands National Park, California, US)

Myliobatis californica (Myliobatidae), better known as Bat Ray or Bat Eagle Ray, is commonly found in sandy and muddy bays and sloughs, also on rocky bottom and in kelp beds, along the coastal waters of the eastern Pacific, from central Oregon in the US to the Gulf of California in Mexico, and in the Galapagos Islands [1]. 

Bat rays are commonly distinguished from other rays because of their distinct, protruding head and large eyes. They have a flat body with a dorsal fin at the base of the tail. The tail is whiplike and can be as long or longer than the width of the body. It is armed with a barbed stinger that is venomous. Bat rays are named for their two long pectoral fins that are shaped like the wings of a bat [2].

Like other ray species, bat rays appear to migrate from inshore waters during the colder months of the year, and return to the same localities year after year [3].

(via ghostisreal)

Filed under bat rays rays wildlife marine life fish elasmobranchii queue

1,679 notes

rhamphotheca:

Super rare Footage of the World’s Fastest Whale
by Jason G. Goldman
One lucky research assistant caught a rare show in the Straits of Gibraltar last week, as a fin whale was spotted breaching the water three times in a row, right in front of her. While fin whales do sometimes breach, it’s rarely seen and even more rarely caught on camera.
The videographer, Séréna, is a summer research assistant with CIRCE, a Spain-based cetacean conservation, research, and education organization.
Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) are the second largest creatures on our planet, just after blue whales. When you consider that the average fin whale needs to hurl its 80+ tons and 89+ feet out of the water and into the air, the spectacle becomes even more amazing. As one of the fastest whales in the world, the fin can reach cruising speeds of 23 mph with short bursts up to 29 mph. (The Sei whale may beat it for short sprints up t0 40mph, but not for cruising speed.) Their impressive speed has given Fin whales the nickname “greyhounds of the deep.”
(go see video at io9)
[source: The Dodo; CIRCE]

rhamphotheca:

Super rare Footage of the World’s Fastest Whale

by Jason G. Goldman

One lucky research assistant caught a rare show in the Straits of Gibraltar last week, as a fin whale was spotted breaching the water three times in a row, right in front of her. While fin whales do sometimes breach, it’s rarely seen and even more rarely caught on camera.

The videographer, Séréna, is a summer research assistant with CIRCE, a Spain-based cetacean conservation, research, and education organization.

Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) are the second largest creatures on our planet, just after blue whales. When you consider that the average fin whale needs to hurl its 80+ tons and 89+ feet out of the water and into the air, the spectacle becomes even more amazing. As one of the fastest whales in the world, the fin can reach cruising speeds of 23 mph with short bursts up to 29 mph. (The Sei whale may beat it for short sprints up t0 40mph, but not for cruising speed.) Their impressive speed has given Fin whales the nickname “greyhounds of the deep.”

(go see video at io9)

[source: The Dodo; CIRCE]

Filed under fin whales WOW breaching cetaceans neato rorquals whales marine life wildlife queue

6 notes

dreams-of-whales:

**Mind the sound, the water sound is a bit loud. Sorry!

I shot this with a GoPro Hero2 off the coast of Lana’i. The camera was attached to a pole mount over the side of the raft. 

Note: The camera was never “dropped” in on top of the dolphins but rather put in before they approached so they could choose to come over or not. As you can see they didn’t seem to take an issue with it.

Filed under cetaceans dolphins marine life wildlife neato queue