The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged monitor lizards

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darwinoid:

Wish you could see a Komodo dragon (V. komodoensis) up close and personal? Photographer Shannon Plummer captures this amazing series (and more!) in her stunning portfolio based on Indonesian wildlife. 

Fun fact: With the use of its hypersensitive forked tongue and directionally inclined Jacobson’s organ, this voracious predator can accurately recognize airborne molecules to decipher both the existence and the direction of its aromatic prey. 

(via thepredatorblog)

Filed under drool komodo dragons monitor lizards lizards wildlife queue

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rhamphotheca:

NY Times:  Coldblooded Does Not Mean Stupid
by Emily Anthes
In the plethora of research over the past few decades on the cognitive capabilities of various species, lizards, turtles and snakes have been left in the back of the class. Few scientists bothered to peer into the reptile mind, and those who did were largely unimpressed.
“Reptiles don’t really have great press,” said Gordon M. Burghardt, a comparative psychologist at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. “Certainly in the past, people didn’t really think too much of their intelligence. They were thought of as instinct machines.”
But now that is beginning to change, thanks to a growing interest in “coldblooded cognition” and recent studies revealing that reptile brains are not as primitive as we imagined. The research could not only redeem reptiles but also shed new light on cognitive evolution.
Because reptiles, birds and mammals diverged so long ago, with a common ancestor that lived 280 million years ago, the emerging data suggest that certain sophisticated mental skills may be more ancient than had been assumed — or so adaptive that they evolved multiple times…
(read more)
photograph: Manuel Leal

rhamphotheca:

NY Times:  Coldblooded Does Not Mean Stupid

by Emily Anthes

In the plethora of research over the past few decades on the cognitive capabilities of various species, lizards, turtles and snakes have been left in the back of the class. Few scientists bothered to peer into the reptile mind, and those who did were largely unimpressed.

“Reptiles don’t really have great press,” said Gordon M. Burghardt, a comparative psychologist at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. “Certainly in the past, people didn’t really think too much of their intelligence. They were thought of as instinct machines.”

But now that is beginning to change, thanks to a growing interest in “coldblooded cognition” and recent studies revealing that reptile brains are not as primitive as we imagined. The research could not only redeem reptiles but also shed new light on cognitive evolution.

Because reptiles, birds and mammals diverged so long ago, with a common ancestor that lived 280 million years ago, the emerging data suggest that certain sophisticated mental skills may be more ancient than had been assumed — or so adaptive that they evolved multiple times…

(read more)

photograph: Manuel Leal

Filed under animal intelligence animal death predation science live feeding red footed tortoises tortoises anoles lizards monitor lizards queue