The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged monkeys

85 notes

Anonymous asked: Is it true that chimpanzees and other primates throw poop?

thejunglenook:

YES!!!!
Chimpanzees and some other nonhuman primates - like
macaques and capuchins to name a few-  do indeed throw stones, food, toys (enrichment objects), and yes even feces.

image

(From this youtube video.)
Warning: The chimpanzee in the video is in a very aggressive and agitated display. Frankly I wouldn’t click on the link because I hate giving this person views. There were signs posted by the staff indicating this female was in estrus (‘heat’) and the OP and friends “decided to mess around with the monkey.”  Just warning you since some of you may find this video upsetting. I certainly do.

Now we tend to focus on the poo aspect here, but just take a minute to recognize how astronomically astounding throwing behavior is. To be able to judge an object’s weight, shape, and other characteristics accurately enough to send said object hurtling through the air at a desired velocity towards a desired target… and then to accurately hit that target! IT’S AMAZING!!! 


image
Frustration at unequal pay. Capuchin monkey throwing cucumber at researcher when another individual gets a grape for the same task. (de Waal,
x)

Mind you, I’m not saying that chimps or monkeys are consciously determining the effect of drag, wind resistance, or other factors during these quick mental calculations when they throw something. But just take a moment to think about throwing a baseball with a friend. Or tossing your car keys to a buddy who is the D.D. for the evening. Or maybe even lobbing a paper airplane at a coworker. You don’t sit there and work out the calculations for precisely how much force is required and what the perfect release angle is for each object… well…
maybe some of you do… but most of us consider all these factors very rapidly in the process of what we like to call aiming.

In fact, researchers at Emory University have looked into nonhuman primate throwing behavior and “found that chimps that both threw more and were more likely to hit their targets showed heightened development in the motor cortex, and more connections between it and the Broca’s area, which they say is an important part of speech in humans.” (x)


Long story short, yes, many primates do throw feces (and other objects). Throwing behavior can be a way to intimidate others, to express aggression / frustration, to flirt (gain the attention of potential mates), or as a part of play behavior. It’s an amazingly varied behavior that we in the Primatology community are still learning about every day.


image
Figure 1. Stills from video recordings, showing moments of two throwing events. 
(a) Pedrita running with a stone just before throwing it at Beiçola;(b) Pedrita picking up a stone, (c, d) running, and (e) throwing the stone at Bochechudo. (Video S1. MP4 download) (x)




Journal Sources:

Falótico T, Ottoni EB (2013) Stone Throwing as a Sexual Display in Wild Female Bearded Capuchin Monkeys, Sapajus libidinosus. PLoS ONE 8(11): e79535. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0079535 [full text]

Hopkins, W.D., Russel, J.L., Schaeffer, J.A. (2011). The neural and cognitive correlates of aimed throwing in chimpanzees: a magnetic resonance image and behavioural study on a unique form of social tool use, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 12, vol. 367 no. 1585 37-47, doi: 10.1098/rstb.2011.0195 
[
full text]

Huffman et al. (2008). Cultured Monkeys: Social Learning Cast in Stones. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17 (6): 410 DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8721.2008.00616.x

Westergaard, G.C., Liv, C., Haynie, M.K., & Soumi, S.J. (2000). A comparative study of aimed throwing by monkeys and humans. Neuropsychologia, 38, 1511-1517 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10906376

Filed under long posts gif gifset poop primates apes chimpanzees capuchin monkeys monkeys queue

126 notes

denizensofearth:

New World vs. Old World monkeys

So you’ve probably  learned how to tell an ape from a monkey, but do you know how to tell an Old World monkey from a New World one?  You can probably guess where you can find them—Old World monkeys are found in Africa (primarily south of the Sahara) and East and Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, while New World monkeys are found in Central and South America.  But there are quite a few physical and behavioral difference between these groups which can help you tell them apart.

FACIAL FEATURES: Old World monkeys have nostrils that are close together that open forward or downward (like humans and other apes).  New World monkeys’ nostrils are farther apart and open to the sides.

TAILS: A number of New World monkeys have prehensile tails (although not all).  Old World monkeys do not have prehensile tails.

PADS: Old World monkeys have thick pads on their buttocks which act as cushions for sitting in the trees or on the ground.  New World monkeys do not have these pads.

HANDS: Old World monkeys have opposable thumbs; New World monkeys’ thumbs are in line with their fingers. 

Other differences that aren’t tied to appearance include care of young—in many New World species, pairs are monogamous and males help to care for young, while Old World monkeys tend to be less monogamous and males do not assist in caring for young (except for gibbons).  Old World monkeys have color vision, while the Howler Monkey is the only New World monkey with color vision.  Old World monkeys also live in a wider variety of habitats from rainforest to desert. New World monkeys also rely more heavily on fruit than Old World monkeys, which are more omnivorous—when they feed on vegetation they eat more foliage than fruit.

(Image 1 Source)(Image 2 Source)(x)(x)(x)

Filed under long posts reference monkeys primates queue

130 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Black Crested Mangabey (Lophocebus aterrimus)

….is a species of old world monkey found throughout the Congo and Angola. Mangabeys are highly arboreal and are typically found foraging in mixed-sex troops of 10-15 individuals among the canopies of trees, and occasionally on the ground. Like most primates they have a diet of primarily fruit, seeds, nectar and other plant material, they will occasionally take insects as well.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Primates-Cercopithecidae-Lophocebus-aterrimus

Image Source(s)

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under monkeys wildlife primates black crested mangabeys queue

326 notes

rhamphotheca:

The World’s Smallest Species of Monkey
A baby pygmy marmoset (Cebuella pygmaea) is seen at a primate rescue and rehabilitation center near Santiago, Chile, on August 3, 2010. The pygmy marmoset, also known as Leoncillo (little lion) and Mono de bosillo (pocket monkey), was confiscated after being found inside the clothes of a Peruvian citizen during a highway police check at the northern city of Antofagasta, some 849 miles of Santiago. The species is under threat of extinction for two main reasons: Humans love to collect them as pets, and we clear-cut the Amazonian trees in which they live.
(photo: Ivan Alvarado/Reuters)               (via: Takepart.org)

rhamphotheca:

The World’s Smallest Species of Monkey

A baby pygmy marmoset (Cebuella pygmaeais seen at a primate rescue and rehabilitation center near Santiago, Chile, on August 3, 2010. The pygmy marmoset, also known as Leoncillo (little lion) and Mono de bosillo (pocket monkey), was confiscated after being found inside the clothes of a Peruvian citizen during a highway police check at the northern city of Antofagasta, some 849 miles of Santiago. The species is under threat of extinction for two main reasons: Humans love to collect them as pets, and we clear-cut the Amazonian trees in which they live.

(photo: Ivan Alvarado/Reuters)               (via: Takepart.org)

Filed under monkeys pygmy marmosets marmosets wildlife

179 notes

rhamphotheca:

Strongest Evidence of Animal Culture Seen in Monkeys and Whales

by Michael Balter

Until fairly recently, many scientists thought that only humans had culture, but that idea is now being crushed by an avalanche of recent research with animals. Two new studies in monkeys and whales take the work further, showing how new cultural traditions can be formed and how conformity might help a species survive and prosper. The findings may also help researchers distinguish the differences between animal and human cultures.

Researchers differ on exactly how to define culture, but most agree that it involves a collective adoption and transmission of one or more behaviors among a group. Humans’ ability to create and transmit new cultural trends has helped our species dominate Earth, in large part because each new generation can benefit from the experiences of the previous one.

Researchers have found that similar, albeit much simpler, cultural transmission takes place in animals, including fish, insects, meerkats, birds, monkeys, and apes. Sometimes these cultural traits seem bizarre, such as the recently developed trend among some capuchin monkeys to poke each other’s eyeballs with their long, sharp fingernails—a behavior that originated among a small group of individuals and which has spread over time…

(read more: http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/04/strongest-evidence-of-animal-cul.html?ref=hp)

(photo: (top, monkies) Erica van de Waal; (bottom, whales) Jennifer Allen/Whale Center of New England; Jennifer Allen/Ocean Alliance)

Filed under animal intelligence cetaceans humpback whales capuchin monkeys monkeys wildlife marine life forest life primates whales

296 notes

rhamphotheca:

Golden Snub-nosed Monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) keep warm in their snowy habitat on Shennongjia Mountain in the Hubei Province of China - by hugging. With their fur coated with icicles the monkeys huddle close together for shelter from the arctic-like weather. Snow can reach a depth of 30cm with temperatures plummeting to as low as -25C. Golden monkeys can withstand colder temperatures than any other non-human primate. There are estimated to be just 800 to 1,300 left in the wild.
(Photograph: Quirky China News/Rex)                 (via: Guardian UK)

rhamphotheca:

Golden Snub-nosed Monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) keep warm in their snowy habitat on Shennongjia Mountain in the Hubei Province of China - by hugging. With their fur coated with icicles the monkeys huddle close together for shelter from the arctic-like weather. Snow can reach a depth of 30cm with temperatures plummeting to as low as -25C. Golden monkeys can withstand colder temperatures than any other non-human primate. There are estimated to be just 800 to 1,300 left in the wild.

(Photograph: Quirky China News/Rex)                 (via: Guardian UK)

Filed under monkeys golden snub nosed monkeys wildlife primates endangered species queue

75 notes

foervraengd:

“The Pride of Baghdad” by Brian K Vaughan
I saw this comic book in my lecturer’s office one time, and I regret not asking to borrow it (it was our last meeting before I graduated) because even though I only took a few peeks of it, it really caught my attention. And now… FINALLY I have found the title of the comic, so now I can look it up again and actually read this awesome piece of art.
From what I’ve seen, the story is about a group of lions that lives in a zoo in Baghdad, and one day the city is under attack and the bombs that drops from the sky more or less set the animals free. So now the lions (+ a lot of other exotic animals from the zoo) has to survive in the middle of a war between the humans.
Oh gosh, even tho I haven’t read the whole comic yet, I would still recommend it. The artwork, the overall plot and the action really is something I haven’t seen before. (But that’s because I suck at finding comics in my taste)

foervraengd:

“The Pride of Baghdad” by Brian K Vaughan

I saw this comic book in my lecturer’s office one time, and I regret not asking to borrow it (it was our last meeting before I graduated) because even though I only took a few peeks of it, it really caught my attention. And now… FINALLY I have found the title of the comic, so now I can look it up again and actually read this awesome piece of art.

From what I’ve seen, the story is about a group of lions that lives in a zoo in Baghdad, and one day the city is under attack and the bombs that drops from the sky more or less set the animals free. So now the lions (+ a lot of other exotic animals from the zoo) has to survive in the middle of a war between the humans.

Oh gosh, even tho I haven’t read the whole comic yet, I would still recommend it. The artwork, the overall plot and the action really is something I haven’t seen before. (But that’s because I suck at finding comics in my taste)

(Source: , via zada2011)

Filed under stuff I gotta read blood the pride of baghdad lions monkeys cats big cats