The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged orcas

485 notes

crozet-clans:

Killer in the Mist (2009) by Stefano Unterthiner"The picture was taken in a torrential rainstorm on Possession Island in the sub-Antarctic Crozet Archipelago. A killer whale family was hunting king penguins and southern elephant seals just off a nearby beach. 
'Over four months, this was the first time,' says Stefano, 'that I saw killer whales so close to shore or to the king penguin rookery.' The penguins were in a terrible panic, he says. 'The drama was intense, what with the enormous male, its dorsal fin slicing through the grey water, and the simply terrible weather.' Stefano spotted the killer whales from the cliff overlooking the beach and then spent more than three hours photographing them in whipping rain. 'It's one of the most unforgettable moments of my life.' ” [x]

crozet-clans:

Killer in the Mist (2009) by Stefano Unterthiner

"The picture was taken in a torrential rainstorm on Possession Island in the sub-Antarctic Crozet Archipelago. A killer whale family was hunting king penguins and southern elephant seals just off a nearby beach.

'Over four months, this was the first time,' says Stefano, 'that I saw killer whales so close to shore or to the king penguin rookery.' The penguins were in a terrible panic, he says. 'The drama was intense, what with the enormous male, its dorsal fin slicing through the grey water, and the simply terrible weather.' Stefano spotted the killer whales from the cliff overlooking the beach and then spent more than three hours photographing them in whipping rain. 'It's one of the most unforgettable moments of my life.' ” [x]

Filed under dolphins birds penguins cetaceans orcas marine life wildlife polar life queue

1,446 notes

taslishaw:

"45"Ink and graphite18 x 40 inchesAll but one of these whales is now dead.Representing the 45 individuals of the southern resident killer whale population that were captured and placed into aquarium facilies around the world. Each is represented as accurately as possible to their true markings.Moby Doll, the first orca ever captured and put on display 50 years ago, is at the top. Tokitae/Lolita, the only survivor, is at the bottom. 

taslishaw:

"45"
Ink and graphite
18 x 40 inches

All but one of these whales is now dead.
Representing the 45 individuals of the southern resident killer whale population that were captured and placed into aquarium facilies around the world. Each is represented as accurately as possible to their true markings.
Moby Doll, the first orca ever captured and put on display 50 years ago, is at the top. Tokitae/Lolita, the only survivor, is at the bottom. 

(via fightingforwhales)

Filed under blood animal death cetaceans marine life wildlife lolita the orca moby doll the orca cetacean freedom orcas dolphins queue

7 notes

fightingforwhales:

alvangs:

ugh reading peoples’ comments on the whole sea world thing on my facebook makes me so sick. the fact that the bill to ban orca sale/trade/sideshows is essentially dead makes me sick. this whole thing makes me sick

It’s not dead! The committee seemed to like it, and Assemblyman Bloom has to go and elaborate on the details of his sea pen plan as well as add/change more details to the bill itself before they vote so they have a better idea of the whole situation.

Filed under california orca bill cetacean freedom cetaceans dolphins orcas queue

844 notes

sciencesoup:

Wave Wash

When summer descends on the Antarctic, the sea ice breaks into chunks called pack ice. Seals often haul themselves up onto them, but they’re not a safe place to rest—not if a pack of killer whales finds you.

Killer whales are top predators with complex social relationships, so they hunt in groups, and they hunt well. In 2009, Dr Robert Pitman and Dr John Durban, marine scientists at NOAA, studied the whales’ extraordinary hunting tactic called “wave-washing” with a crew filming the documentary Frozen Planet, off the western Antarctic Peninsula.

Here’s how it went down: The whales line up, sometimes seven abreast, and charge towards the ice floe where the poor seal is stranded. Then, as they dive under it, they work together to kick up their tails and create a wave that rushes over the ice. The whales repeats this an average of four times before the terrified seal is eventually knocked off, then they work to corner it, blowing bubbles and creating turbulence to create confusion, before finally drowning it.

The researchers also found that the killer whales actually skin and dissect their prey underwater before dividing it up between the group.

Previous research has shown that there are at least four distinctive types of killer whale living in the Antarctic, all with different colourings and behaviours, and this particular population is referred to as “pack ice killer whales.” These different groups don’t seem to mix even though their territories overlap, so more research needs to be done to see if they’re separate species of just different subspecies.

(Gif Credit)

(via fightingforwhales)

Filed under gif predation marine life wildlife polar life pinnipeds cetaceans orcas dolphins queue long posts