The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged predation

148 notes

paramortality asked: I was watching QI, and there was a question on a vegetarian spider. Do you know anything about it?

bogleech:

Yep, Bagheera kiplingi, named in honor of the Jungle Book, feeds on tiny nutrient capsules produced by a species of Acacia tree.

These trees live in close symbiosis with ants, producing the capsules entirely to feed the ants who live in its hollow outgrowths and defend it from pests.

The spider carefully sneaks around the tree, dodging ants with its sheer agility and gets most of its food from plant matter, but it’s not completely vegan; it will also sometimes steal the eggs, larvae and pupa carried by ant workers!

Filed under predation bagheera kiplingi spiders wildlife neato

0 notes

Condor Watch

Hey, wanna help scientists study the endangered California Condor? Here’s your chance!

With Condor Watch, you’ll be helping researchers ID condors to help them figure out what, if anything, their social structure has to do with who gets lead poisoning from animals killed by lead bullets. You’re presented with photos from feeding stations and asked to ID what scavengers are there, and if condors are present, things like their ID tags and age.

There are a lot of mangled animal carcasses at the feeding stations which some viewers may find upsetting, so careful there if gore and/or animal death is something you’re sensitive to. Zooniverse has plenty of research projects you can help out with, but as a Pacific Northwest native the California Condors are really important to me, so I though I’d get the word out.

Filed under condors california condors wildlife birds conservation predation scavenging zooniverse

4,522 notes

libutron:

somersault1824:

The Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca), an African waterbird, have a unique and dastardly predation tactic called canopy feeding.
They hunch over and form their wings into a circular makeshift umbrella over the water. This blocks out the sunlight and creates a small area of darkness underneath. In addition to helping the bird see what’s going on in the murk, surrounding fish are lulled into a false sense of security by making them think that either night has fallen or the shady area is a safe refuge. It’s neither. When a gullible fish then proceeds to poke its head out from its hiding place to investigate, it’s curtains by way of a brutal beak stab.
via The Featured Creature
Pictures by Tony Faria and Steve Garvie
http://ift.tt/M7AKWd

libutron:

somersault1824:

The Black Heron (Egretta ardesiaca), an African waterbird, have a unique and dastardly predation tactic called canopy feeding.

They hunch over and form their wings into a circular makeshift umbrella over the water. This blocks out the sunlight and creates a small area of darkness underneath. In addition to helping the bird see what’s going on in the murk, surrounding fish are lulled into a false sense of security by making them think that either night has fallen or the shady area is a safe refuge. It’s neither. When a gullible fish then proceeds to poke its head out from its hiding place to investigate, it’s curtains by way of a brutal beak stab.

via The Featured Creature

Pictures by Tony Faria and Steve Garvie

http://ift.tt/M7AKWd

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under neato predation wildlife black herons herons queue

1,253 notes

bogleech:

Whenever the subject of hyenas come up, there’s always someone itching to debunk their “negative” stereotype as “mere” corpse-eaters, pointing out that they’re actually the savannah’s top predators, and even lions, they say with at least a hint of smug satisfaction, are more likely to pick at carrion, even frequently stealing the kills from poor, misunderstood hyenas.
Now, this is all certainly true, for spotted hyenas. They are the largest of the three “true” extant hyenas, and they are extremely effective hunters.
Being a hunter, however, is not a “superior” or more “honorable” way of existence. It’s just a different one. There’s nothing shameful or disgusting about being a scavenger; we’re just culturally trained to romanticize killing and naturally turned off by the idea of eating anything too rotten, since we aren’t generally adapted to handle that ourselves.
The two other hyena species (not counting the Aardwolf) are the brown hyena - Hyaena brunnea - and the striped hyena - Hyaena hyaena. Both of these smaller, shyer animals are regular carrion eaters. When they hunt, they hunt smaller animals, such as lizards and rodents, depending heavily upon stronger predators to bring down larger meals for them and well adapted to consume even the most rancid offal without getting sick.
Hyaena hyaena even has some further specialization for eating pure bone; once meat-eaters are done picking a carcass, they can still make use of the skeleton, and consume so much bone, so often, that their feces in the wild is often white and powdery.
Don’t sweep these little guys under the rug just to make hyenas out to be more “noble” hunters; we shouldn’t even have that concept in our heads. There are no “lower” and “higher” life forms in nature. It’s not “powerful” to be a killer, it’s just one of many survival options all with their own share of advantages and risks.
http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.3957/056.043.0115
http://www.rscn.org.jo/orgsite/Portals/0/Reports%20RSCN/Microsoft%20Word%20-%20Amr_-_Hyaena_ohne_Karte.pdf

bogleech:

Whenever the subject of hyenas come up, there’s always someone itching to debunk their “negative” stereotype as “mere” corpse-eaters, pointing out that they’re actually the savannah’s top predators, and even lions, they say with at least a hint of smug satisfaction, are more likely to pick at carrion, even frequently stealing the kills from poor, misunderstood hyenas.

Now, this is all certainly true, for spotted hyenas. They are the largest of the three “true” extant hyenas, and they are extremely effective hunters.

Being a hunter, however, is not a “superior” or more “honorable” way of existence. It’s just a different one. There’s nothing shameful or disgusting about being a scavenger; we’re just culturally trained to romanticize killing and naturally turned off by the idea of eating anything too rotten, since we aren’t generally adapted to handle that ourselves.

The two other hyena species (not counting the Aardwolf) are the brown hyena - Hyaena brunnea - and the striped hyena - Hyaena hyaena. Both of these smaller, shyer animals are regular carrion eaters. When they hunt, they hunt smaller animals, such as lizards and rodents, depending heavily upon stronger predators to bring down larger meals for them and well adapted to consume even the most rancid offal without getting sick.

Hyaena hyaena even has some further specialization for eating pure bone; once meat-eaters are done picking a carcass, they can still make use of the skeleton, and consume so much bone, so often, that their feces in the wild is often white and powdery.

Don’t sweep these little guys under the rug just to make hyenas out to be more “noble” hunters; we shouldn’t even have that concept in our heads. There are no “lower” and “higher” life forms in nature. It’s not “powerful” to be a killer, it’s just one of many survival options all with their own share of advantages and risks.

http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.3957/056.043.0115

http://www.rscn.org.jo/orgsite/Portals/0/Reports%20RSCN/Microsoft%20Word%20-%20Amr_-_Hyaena_ohne_Karte.pdf

Filed under long posts hyenas wildlife spotted hyenas brown hyenas striped hyenas predation scavenging queue

1,007 notes

ursulavernon:



Once upon a time, there was a fetching young wolverine who, wearing her favorite red hood, went skipping through the fields, on the way to her grandmother’s house, carrying a basket of tasty goodies.*
A wolf, who was lurking at the edge of the woods, descended upon the young wolverine and said “Hello, little red riding wolverine, and where are you going in such a hurry?”
"To visit my grandmother," said the young wolverine, as demure and maidenly as a gravelly wolverine baritone can be.
"To visit your…to…grand…to..my goodness, what big teeth you have…" said the wolf, who seemed to have lost his train of thought somewhere.
The wolverine nodded.
"And what…big…claws…you have…" said the wolf, in much the same tone as General Custer commenting on the surprising number of locals at Little Bighorn.
The wolverine nodded.
"I’ll just bugger off, shall I?" said the wolf.
The wolverine nodded.
The wolf slunk gratefully back into the trees and hyperventilated quietly, and the little red riding wolverine skipped merrily through the woods to her grandmother’s house and they ate assorted rodents and watched cartoons and baked cookies happily ever after.  - Ursula Vernon
—————————
*Pepperidge Farms’ Mixed Rodent Party Assortment, to be precise, a pretty good value for the money, although everybody always picks through and eats the gerbils first.


Awwww! Thanks, guys!

ursulavernon:

Once upon a time, there was a fetching young wolverine who, wearing her favorite red hood, went skipping through the fields, on the way to her grandmother’s house, carrying a basket of tasty goodies.*

A wolf, who was lurking at the edge of the woods, descended upon the young wolverine and said “Hello, little red riding wolverine, and where are you going in such a hurry?”

"To visit my grandmother," said the young wolverine, as demure and maidenly as a gravelly wolverine baritone can be.

"To visit your…to…grand…to..my goodness, what big teeth you have…" said the wolf, who seemed to have lost his train of thought somewhere.

The wolverine nodded.

"And what…big…claws…you have…" said the wolf, in much the same tone as General Custer commenting on the surprising number of locals at Little Bighorn.

The wolverine nodded.

"I’ll just bugger off, shall I?" said the wolf.

The wolverine nodded.

The wolf slunk gratefully back into the trees and hyperventilated quietly, and the little red riding wolverine skipped merrily through the woods to her grandmother’s house and they ate assorted rodents and watched cartoons and baked cookies happily ever after.  - Ursula Vernon

—————————

*Pepperidge Farms’ Mixed Rodent Party Assortment, to be precise, a pretty good value for the money, although everybody always picks through and eats the gerbils first.

Awwww! Thanks, guys!

Filed under long posts oh dear little red riding hood ursula vernon anthros furries wolf anthros wolverine anthros predation queue