The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged symbiosis

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ivynajspyder:

gryzio:

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astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus Lybia

(Boxer Crabs)

also known as pom-pom crabs, Boxer Crabs are a genus of small crabs in the family Xanthidae (mud crabs). the name pom-pom/or boxer comes from the mutualism that they hold with sea anemones, in which they hold the cnidarian in their claws and use them for defense, and in turn the sea anemone gets more food by moving around.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arhtropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Decapoda-Branchyura-Xanthidae-Lybia

Source,Source

HE’S SO CUTE

I FUCKING CANNOT WITH THIS CUTIE

:D

Filed under pom pom crabs wildlife symbiosis mutualism sea anenomes crustaceans gif so cute it hurts queue

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theecolologist:

Deer Diary: The Benefits of ‘Monkeyin’ Around‘…


Researchers from Kyoto University, Japan, have discovered that Sika deer on Yakushima Island have learned to ‘eavesdrop’ on the calls of Macaque monkeys as part of their foraging strategy. 

Ella Davies of BBC Nature reports:

A team from Kyoto University, Japan, tested how macaque monkey calls affected the feeding behaviour of the deer that live on Yakushima Island.

Previous research has focussed on species “listening to” one another to avoid danger.

But when scientists played macaque calls from hidden speakers, the deer gathered nearby, indicating that they associate the sounds with benefits.

Dr Hiroki Koda who led the study said it was a good example of “possible interspecies communication” and that the deer seemed to be eavesdropping as a “foraging strategy”.The results were published in the journal Behavioural Processes.

Yakushima Island lies to the south of Kyushu, Japan, and is protected by its Unesco world heritage status.

The island, which includes the ancient and famous Yakusugi Forest, is home to 1,900 species and subspecies of fauna. The deer and macaques that live there feed on the fruit of camphor trees.

Researchers first reported the deer “gleaning” fruit from beneath trees where monkeys were feeding in 2004.

Dr Koda from the Primate Research Institute at Kyoto University wanted to investigate how the deer were able to follow the monkeys to foraging sites.

After hiding speakers in the forest he played recordings of calls commonly made between the monkeys during feeding sessions.

In his experiments, Dr Koda found that groups of deer often gathered near speakers during the playbacks, but they rarely gathered during “silent” periods when no calls were played.

Dr Koda now aims to investigate whether the deer can differentiate between the various food calls made by the monkeys.

He explained that there were “many common food items” that both deer and macaques ate.

“But of course,” he said, “some food items are used only by macaques, or only by sika deer.

“When macaques make food-associated calls [for] “macaque fruits”, sika deer might not [respond].”

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under science symbiosis macaques deer monkeys

226 notes

rhamphotheca:

Parasitic Plants Actually Steal Genes From the Hosts
by Alasdair Wilkins
The Malaysian plant Rafflesia cantleyi is a parasite, attaching itself to another plant and deriving all its food from its unfortunate host. But Rafflesia doesn’t stop there. It swipes genes from its host, sometimes actually completely replace its old genes.
All of us take part in gene sharing - we all get genes from our parents, and many then pass on genes to their kids. It’s a process called vertical gene transfer since it happens during reproduction from one generation to the next. Horizontal gene transfer happens when two different organisms swap genetic information - the best-known example is when bacteria share their resistance to antibiotics between each other.
While most horizontal gene transfer is the domain of microscopic species, some larger organisms are capable of this trick as well. In the case of Rafflesia, individual organisms have used their lifelong linkups to their hosts - which are, somewhat confusingly, named Tetrastigma rafflee - to upgrade their genes. These aren’t minor changes - some of the plants have stolen the genes for such fundamental processes as respiration and metabolism from the host, then thrown it away. They now quite literally wouldn’t be able to live without their plundered genetics.
(read more: io9)       (image: NeilsPhotography | Flickr)

rhamphotheca:

Parasitic Plants Actually Steal Genes From the Hosts

by Alasdair Wilkins

The Malaysian plant Rafflesia cantleyi is a parasite, attaching itself to another plant and deriving all its food from its unfortunate host. But Rafflesia doesn’t stop there. It swipes genes from its host, sometimes actually completely replace its old genes.

All of us take part in gene sharing - we all get genes from our parents, and many then pass on genes to their kids. It’s a process called vertical gene transfer since it happens during reproduction from one generation to the next. Horizontal gene transfer happens when two different organisms swap genetic information - the best-known example is when bacteria share their resistance to antibiotics between each other.

While most horizontal gene transfer is the domain of microscopic species, some larger organisms are capable of this trick as well. In the case of Rafflesia, individual organisms have used their lifelong linkups to their hosts - which are, somewhat confusingly, named Tetrastigma rafflee - to upgrade their genes. These aren’t minor changes - some of the plants have stolen the genes for such fundamental processes as respiration and metabolism from the host, then thrown it away. They now quite literally wouldn’t be able to live without their plundered genetics.

(read more: io9)       (image: NeilsPhotography | Flickr)

Filed under rafflesia genetics botany symbiosis malaysia asia plants science