The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged waterfowl

2,101 notes

animaltoday:

Comb Duck and Knob-Billed Duck (Sarkidiornis melanotos) -

Comb ducks are one of the largest species of duck, and they are the only members of the genus Sarkidiornis.  There are two subspecies of comb duck.  They differ only slightly by size and color.  These ducks are common in pan-tropical regions of Madagascar, southern parts of Asia and northern parts of Argentina.  

Male ducks have a large knob on their beaks and are larger than females.  Juveniles are more mottled and their feathers are duller brown.  As they mature, their wings become black and iridescent, and their breasts and undersides become whiter.  They live and feed in groups, eating mostly water vegetation and sometimes fish.  Unlike many other ducks, they prefer to perch in trees.

Photos: (top) (bottom left) (bottom right)

(via denizensofearth)

Filed under ducks comb ducks knob billed ducks wildlife waterfowl birds queue

281,419 notes

erpsicle:

birdsbirds:

hookteeth:

DUCKS DO IT TOO

good news, everyone.

oh man. one time i was out with a group of friends, it was around 3 in the morning and we’d all just spilled out of this nightclub, all completely smashed, when one guy goes “OI DID YOU SEE THAT? THAT LIGHT JUST THEN??” and this  fUCKING LASER DOT ZOOMS PAST US ON THE GROUND AND WE’RE ALL LIKE YOOOOO DAFUQ IS DIS??? I SWEAR TO GOD WE SPENT NEARLY TEN MINUTES CHASING THIS FUCKING THING AROUND THE STREET BEFORE WE FIGURED OUT THERE WAS SOME ASSHOLE LIKE 10 STORIES UP IN THE APARTMENT BEHIND US PISSING HIMSELF.

so yeah. cats, ducks and drunk college students. fucking idiots the lot of them.

(Source: onlylolgifs, via zada2011)

Filed under oh dear gif gifset ducks humans birds waterfowl queue

85 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Masked Finfoot (Heliopais personatus)

Also known as the Asian Finfoot, the Masked Finfoot is a species of aquatic bird found throughout Southeast Asia and Indonesia. Finfoots are aquatic specialists using their lobed feet and streamlined body to move through the water with ease. They feed mostly on invertebrates but will take fish when given the chance. Sadly the masked finfoot is listed as endangered as habitat loss and human disturbance has lowered their population to 2,500 birds.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Gruiformes-Heliornithidae-Heliopais-personatus

Image Source(s)

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under birds waterfowl endangered species masked finfoots

104 notes

carriemp:

These two juvenile ducks were found following people into a cafe in downtown State College. One of our interns happened to be there and saw it happening, and brought them in. They have no fear of humans, and were both fairly skinny by the time they arrived. Their wings are also clipped. 
All signs point to the fact that these were probably “Easter ducklings” - marketed as a cute, fuzzy gift for children around the holiday. They became acclimated to being cared for by humans, and lost all of their natural fear. Once they started growing, and turning into actual adult ducks, they were dumped and, hungry, lost, and confused, they started tailing whichever humans they could find. 
They’re very sweet, and hate to be separated. Yesterday while I was washing some crud off of the feet of the black one, his friend made quite the racket. He only settled down when they were back together. 
We’ll get their weight back up, and hang on to them until they’ve matured, and then they’ll be placed with one of our volunteers who lives on a farm with a lake. She takes in all of our misfit ducks, and takes wonderful care of them. 
But please folks, understand that animals are not disposable. Whether it’s a dog, or a cat, or a lizard, or a duckling, if you purchase a creature you’re taking responsibility for it for the rest of it’s natural life. 

carriemp:

These two juvenile ducks were found following people into a cafe in downtown State College. One of our interns happened to be there and saw it happening, and brought them in. They have no fear of humans, and were both fairly skinny by the time they arrived. Their wings are also clipped. 

All signs point to the fact that these were probably “Easter ducklings” - marketed as a cute, fuzzy gift for children around the holiday. They became acclimated to being cared for by humans, and lost all of their natural fear. Once they started growing, and turning into actual adult ducks, they were dumped and, hungry, lost, and confused, they started tailing whichever humans they could find. 

They’re very sweet, and hate to be separated. Yesterday while I was washing some crud off of the feet of the black one, his friend made quite the racket. He only settled down when they were back together. 

We’ll get their weight back up, and hang on to them until they’ve matured, and then they’ll be placed with one of our volunteers who lives on a farm with a lake. She takes in all of our misfit ducks, and takes wonderful care of them. 

But please folks, understand that animals are not disposable. Whether it’s a dog, or a cat, or a lizard, or a duckling, if you purchase a creature you’re taking responsibility for it for the rest of it’s natural life. 

(via metazoa-etcetera)

Filed under ducks pets waterfowl signal boosting