The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged wildlife

465 notes

jadafitch:

Passenger Pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius)
This September is the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon.In the nineteenth century, the Passenger Pigeon was one of the most common birds in the world.  There are records of flocks that stretched a mile long and contained billions of birds.  By the early twentieth century though, they were nearly extinct.  After European settlers arrived, much of their habitat was destroyed, and they were exploited as an inexpensive food source.  By the time it was understood that the Passenger Pigeon needed protection, it was too late.  Martha, the very last one died one hundred years ago, on September 1st 1914.  The loss of this beautiful bird gained public’s attention, which resulted in many new conservation and protection law and practices. 

jadafitch:

Passenger Pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius)

This September is the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon.

In the nineteenth century, the Passenger Pigeon was one of the most common birds in the world.  There are records of flocks that stretched a mile long and contained billions of birds.  By the early twentieth century though, they were nearly extinct.  After European settlers arrived, much of their habitat was destroyed, and they were exploited as an inexpensive food source.  By the time it was understood that the Passenger Pigeon needed protection, it was too late.  Martha, the very last one died one hundred years ago, on September 1st 1914.  The loss of this beautiful bird gained public’s attention, which resulted in many new conservation and protection law and practices. 

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under sads holocene extinctions passenger pigeons wildlife

7,653 notes

biomorphosis:

The maned wolf is the largest canine species in South America and closely resembles a red fox on stilts because of its long legs. It is neither a wolf, fox, coyote, or dog  but rather a member of its own Chrysocyon genus, making it a truly unique animal. They possess a mane that runs from the back of the head to the shoulders which can be erected to intimidate other animals when displaying aggression or when they feel threatened. 

Unlike other wolves that live in packs, maned wolves do not form or hunt in packs but prefer to live alone.  Maned wolf is considered as the last surviving species of the Pleistocene Extinction, which wiped out all other large canids from the continent.

(via koryos)

Filed under maned wolves canines wildlife gif gifset queue

628 notes

rhamphotheca:

Fish Out of Water Learn to Walk

Around 400 million years ago, fish left the water and started to evolve into land-loving creatures. But how did the transition happen? A new and unusual experiment could shed some light on the kinds of changes that enabled fins to become limbs. Researchers took a fish species known to be able to walk on its fins from time to time, and raised it on land. Watch the fish promenade in this Nature Video.

Read the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13708

Read the News & Views: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13743

Filed under bichir fish wildlife prehistoric life science neato queue

289 notes

libutron:

Cape Hare - Lepus capensis
The Cape hare, scientifically named Lepus capensis (Lagomorpha - Leporidae), is a typical hare in appearance, with long, slender limbs, large hind feet, a short tail, large eyes and large ears.
The backs of the ears have white outer edges and black tips, and may be ‘flashed’ when the hare is being pursued, possibly to confuse predators.
The Cape hare is well adapted to living in arid and desert environments, with a low metabolic rate, concentrated urine (to minimize water loss), and the ability to drink more saline water than other hares. Those huge ears are in fact a thermoregulatory mechanism to radiate heat and then cool themselves. 
This hare has a very wide distribution, being found across most non-forested regions of Africa, through the Arabian Peninsula and Middle East.
Other common names: Desert Hare, Arabian Hare, Brown Hare.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Drew Gardner | Locality: Taweelah, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (2006)

libutron:

Cape Hare - Lepus capensis

The Cape hare, scientifically named Lepus capensis (Lagomorpha - Leporidae), is a typical hare in appearance, with long, slender limbs, large hind feet, a short tail, large eyes and large ears.

The backs of the ears have white outer edges and black tips, and may be ‘flashed’ when the hare is being pursued, possibly to confuse predators.

The Cape hare is well adapted to living in arid and desert environments, with a low metabolic rate, concentrated urine (to minimize water loss), and the ability to drink more saline water than other hares. Those huge ears are in fact a thermoregulatory mechanism to radiate heat and then cool themselves. 

This hare has a very wide distribution, being found across most non-forested regions of Africa, through the Arabian Peninsula and Middle East.

Other common names: Desert Hare, Arabian Hare, Brown Hare.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Drew Gardner | Locality: Taweelah, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (2006)

(via koryos)

Filed under lagomorphs hares cape hares wildlife queue

1,650 notes

biomorphosis:

The bat-eared fox is named for its huge ears, which can grow to be more than five inches long and stand out much like the ears on a bat. These foxes live in family units and typically eat insects to survive. 
This amazing animal can eat more than a million termites per year and can actually help control the termite population. They rarely drink water because they are able to hydrate with all the bugs they eat.

biomorphosis:

The bat-eared fox is named for its huge ears, which can grow to be more than five inches long and stand out much like the ears on a bat. These foxes live in family units and typically eat insects to survive. 

This amazing animal can eat more than a million termites per year and can actually help control the termite population. They rarely drink water because they are able to hydrate with all the bugs they eat.

(via koryos)

Filed under foxes gif bat eared foxes canines wildlife queue