The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged wildlife

214 notes

libutron:

The Kodkod - Leopardus guigna -The smallest felid in the Americas
Commonly known as Kodkod, Guiña, Chilean Cat, Guigna and Guina, Leopardus guigna (Felidae) is reputed to be the smallest species of wild cat in the Western Hemisphere, averaging up to 52 cm in length, no larger than a typical house cat. 
They are similar in appearance to Geoffroy’s cats (Leopardus geoffroyi) except kodkods have less distinct stripes on their head and shoulder regions and they have thicker tails.
Besides being the smallest felid in the Americas, kodkods also has the smallest distribution. This species is only found in central and southern Chile, Chiloé Island of Chile, Guaitecas Island of Chile, the Andes Mountains, and western Argentina. Having a patchy area of occupancy, currently Leopardus guigna is listed as Vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Christopher Momberg | Locality: Termas de Chillán, Chile (2014)

libutron:

The Kodkod - Leopardus guigna -The smallest felid in the Americas

Commonly known as Kodkod, Guiña, Chilean Cat, Guigna and Guina, Leopardus guigna (Felidae) is reputed to be the smallest species of wild cat in the Western Hemisphere, averaging up to 52 cm in length, no larger than a typical house cat. 

They are similar in appearance to Geoffroy’s cats (Leopardus geoffroyi) except kodkods have less distinct stripes on their head and shoulder regions and they have thicker tails.

Besides being the smallest felid in the Americas, kodkods also has the smallest distribution. This species is only found in central and southern Chile, Chiloé Island of Chile, Guaitecas Island of Chile, the Andes Mountains, and western Argentina. Having a patchy area of occupancy, currently Leopardus guigna is listed as Vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Christopher Momberg | Locality: Termas de Chillán, Chile (2014)

(via koryos)

Filed under kodkods wildlife cats wildcats queue

139 notes

rhamphotheca:

White-tailed Deer grow new antlers every year. 
They grow from bony bases on the skull called peduncles, and are themselves bone. As they’re growing, they are soft and receive a rich blood supply through the velvet covering. Deer antlers are among the fastest-growing tissues in the animal kingdom, growing by up to 2 inches (5 cm) a week during peak growth in the summer. By late August or September the blood supply is cut off and the velvet is shed, usually within about 24 hours. 
The antlers’ primary purpose is in jousts between males to establish dominance during breeding season, but they are also an indicator of the physical condition of the male. Antlers are not strongly correlated to age - you can’t count the points and tell how old a deer is - though peak size usually occurs between 5-8 years old. Instead, antler size is mainly determined by genetics and the nutrition of the deer’s diet as they’re growing; a bigger rack usually indicates a healthier deer, at least within its age group. 
The antlers have no big advantage outside of the mating season, and the extra weight and size can be energetically costly, so by mid-winter, as a result of dropping testosterone levels, the joint between the antler and the peduncle weakens and the antler is shed. Male deer are antler-less for 3-4 months of the year, until new ones begin growing again in spring.photograph: USDA/Scott Bauer
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

White-tailed Deer grow new antlers every year.

They grow from bony bases on the skull called peduncles, and are themselves bone. As they’re growing, they are soft and receive a rich blood supply through the velvet covering. Deer antlers are among the fastest-growing tissues in the animal kingdom, growing by up to 2 inches (5 cm) a week during peak growth in the summer. By late August or September the blood supply is cut off and the velvet is shed, usually within about 24 hours.

The antlers’ primary purpose is in jousts between males to establish dominance during breeding season, but they are also an indicator of the physical condition of the male. Antlers are not strongly correlated to age - you can’t count the points and tell how old a deer is - though peak size usually occurs between 5-8 years old. Instead, antler size is mainly determined by genetics and the nutrition of the deer’s diet as they’re growing; a bigger rack usually indicates a healthier deer, at least within its age group.

The antlers have no big advantage outside of the mating season, and the extra weight and size can be energetically costly, so by mid-winter, as a result of dropping testosterone levels, the joint between the antler and the peduncle weakens and the antler is shed. Male deer are antler-less for 3-4 months of the year, until new ones begin growing again in spring.

photograph:
USDA/Scott Bauer

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Filed under deer whitetail deer wildlife queue

90 notes

koryos:

African wild dogs with floppy ears!

In the above video you can not only see some interesting communal scent marking behaviors (can you spot which two are likely to be the breeding pair?) but two dogs with floppy ears!

This condition is found in African wild dogs in both captivity and in the wild (as in the video) and can be caused either by physical afflictions like ear mites or by a genetic condition.

Either way, fascinating how “domestic” it makes the wild dogs look, don’t you think?

Filed under african wild dogs canines wildlife queue

107 notes

phoenixzoo:

It’s #GlobalTigerDay and Jai knows how to celebrate, with his favorite keg! Empty kegs make excellent toys for tigers as they can withstand a lot of tiger sized punishment. Join Jai in celebrating Global Tiger Day by getting involved with tiger conservation today and you can help save tigers!
#InternationalTigerDay #SaveTigers #endangered #PhoenixZoo #photooftheday #picoftheday #tiger #conservation (at Phoenix Zoo)

phoenixzoo:

It’s #GlobalTigerDay and Jai knows how to celebrate, with his favorite keg! Empty kegs make excellent toys for tigers as they can withstand a lot of tiger sized punishment. Join Jai in celebrating Global Tiger Day by getting involved with tiger conservation today and you can help save tigers!

#InternationalTigerDay #SaveTigers #endangered #PhoenixZoo #photooftheday #picoftheday #tiger #conservation (at Phoenix Zoo)

(via actuallycute)

Filed under tigers cats big cats wildlife oh dear

1,889 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Wire-crested Thorntail (Discosura popelairii)
…a rare and striking species of hummingbird which occurs in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Where it inhabits solely inhabits lowland forests, and is not tolerant of secondary habitats. Like most striking plumaged birds wire-crested thorntails are sexually dimorphic with lacking the long “wire” crests and “thorn” tails of males. In typical humming bird fashion wire-crested thorntails feed on nectar from flowers, but will occasionally take insects as well. 
Currently Discosura popelairii is listed as near threatened by the IUCN, as it faces accelerating threats from deforestation in the Amazon Basin. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Apodiformes-Trochilidae-Discosura-D. popelairii
Image: Bill Bouton

astronomy-to-zoology:

Wire-crested Thorntail (Discosura popelairii)

…a rare and striking species of hummingbird which occurs in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Where it inhabits solely inhabits lowland forests, and is not tolerant of secondary habitats. Like most striking plumaged birds wire-crested thorntails are sexually dimorphic with lacking the long “wire” crests and “thorn” tails of males. In typical humming bird fashion wire-crested thorntails feed on nectar from flowers, but will occasionally take insects as well. 

Currently Discosura popelairii is listed as near threatened by the IUCN, as it faces accelerating threats from deforestation in the Amazon Basin. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Apodiformes-Trochilidae-Discosura-D. popelairii

Image: Bill Bouton

(via koryos)

Filed under birds wire crested thorntail wildlife hummingbirds queue