The Lurkdragon's Lair

Fifty percent animals, fifty percent fandom, one-hundred percent nerd.

Posts tagged wildlife

12,885 notes

tamorapierce:

stormphyre:

paranoidgemsbok:

sweetguts:

cool-critters:

King of saxony bird-of-paradise (Pteridophora alberti)

The King of Saxony is a bird in the bird-of-paradise family (Paradisaeidae).  It is endemic to montane forest in New Guinea. The bird is sometimes referred to as “Kiss-a-ba” by the natives of Papua New Guinea and Western New Guinea, as a human interpretation of the male’s loud call. Adult males are territorial. The male guards its territory from perches placed in the tops of tall trees, and from these perches sings to compete with males in neighbouring territories. While singing, the male moves his occipital plumes about.

look it’s gabe

YOU MUST HEAR IT

I’m tired and read it as King of Sexy bird

Can you imagine one of these guys going through a revolving door?  Now two!  Now three!

Yeah, I’m in a mood.

(via koryos)

Filed under long posts birds king of saxony birds of paradise birds of paradise wildlife neato queue

380 notes

rhamphotheca:

The Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) 
… is the largest living species of fish, with individuals reaching lengths of 41 feet (12.5 m) or more. Though fearsome in size, Whale Sharks are gentle giants. They feed on plankton and small fish, and are generally quite tame and docile around divers. 
Unlike dolphins and whales, which give birth to a single large baby, Whale Sharks are ovoviviparous - they produce up to a few hundred eggs, which the mother incubates within her body. They are fertilized slowly using stored sperm, and babies are birthed with regularity rather than in one large event. When born, young Whale Sharks are dwarfed by their mother, measuring only 16 to 24 inches (40 to 60 cm) long. Individuals take a long time to reach sexual maturity, first starting to breed around 30 years old, but may live to ages of 70 or more years. 
They inhabit tropical and sub-tropical oceans worldwide; on North America’s coasts, they are primarily found off California in the Pacific, and sometimes as far north as New York in the Atlantic.
photo by Zac Wolf, borrowed from Wikimedia
(via: Peterson Field Guides)

rhamphotheca:

The Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus)

… is the largest living species of fish, with individuals reaching lengths of 41 feet (12.5 m) or more. Though fearsome in size, Whale Sharks are gentle giants. They feed on plankton and small fish, and are generally quite tame and docile around divers.

Unlike dolphins and whales, which give birth to a single large baby, Whale Sharks are ovoviviparous - they produce up to a few hundred eggs, which the mother incubates within her body. They are fertilized slowly using stored sperm, and babies are birthed with regularity rather than in one large event. When born, young Whale Sharks are dwarfed by their mother, measuring only 16 to 24 inches (40 to 60 cm) long. Individuals take a long time to reach sexual maturity, first starting to breed around 30 years old, but may live to ages of 70 or more years.

They inhabit tropical and sub-tropical oceans worldwide; on North America’s coasts, they are primarily found off California in the Pacific, and sometimes as far north as New York in the Atlantic.

photo by Zac Wolf, borrowed from Wikimedia

(via: Peterson Field Guides)

Filed under sharks whale sharks elasmobranchii fish wildlife marine life queue

386 notes

libutron:

Harlequin Toad - Atelopus spumarius barbotini
This is a toad endemic to the Central Massif of French Guiana. It can be easily distinguished from the other species of the Guianan region by its body color and the shape of its dorsal pattern. However, despite being very distinctive, the taxonomy of the species or subspecies is not fully resolved.
Formerly this toad was called Atelopus spumarius barbotini (Bufonidae), but it seems that populations of this form and another ones in the Atelopus spumarius group might be treated as a species complex, and it has not been cleared out how many and how they are related. 
Anyway, the species Atelopus spumarius, including its subspecies, is regarded as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Henk Wallays | Locality: Panama (2008)

libutron:

Harlequin Toad - Atelopus spumarius barbotini

This is a toad endemic to the Central Massif of French Guiana. It can be easily distinguished from the other species of the Guianan region by its body color and the shape of its dorsal pattern. However, despite being very distinctive, the taxonomy of the species or subspecies is not fully resolved.

Formerly this toad was called Atelopus spumarius barbotini (Bufonidae), but it seems that populations of this form and another ones in the Atelopus spumarius group might be treated as a species complex, and it has not been cleared out how many and how they are related. 

Anyway, the species Atelopus spumarius, including its subspecies, is regarded as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Henk Wallays | Locality: Panama (2008)

(via rhamphotheca)

Filed under toads harlequin toads wildlife queue

1,041 notes

libutron:

Western Grey Plantain-eater - Crinifer piscator
The Western Grey Plantain-eater, scientifically named Crinifer piscator (Cuculiformes - Musophagidae), is a West African species whose call is one of the most familiar of this area.
Like all turacos, this one is strongly territorial. They can be seen in family groups for long time. The group may travel large distances to find abundant food source such as a particularly favoured fruiting tree. 
They are monogamous with strong pair-bonds. These birds display effusive greetings bowing their heads and spread their tail fan. Rituals also include mutual exchange of food and loud calls when they perch in the treetops.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Isidro Vila Verde | Locality: Abuko Reserve, Sara Job Kunda, Western, The Gambia (2007)

libutron:

Western Grey Plantain-eater - Crinifer piscator

The Western Grey Plantain-eater, scientifically named Crinifer piscator (Cuculiformes - Musophagidae), is a West African species whose call is one of the most familiar of this area.

Like all turacos, this one is strongly territorial. They can be seen in family groups for long time. The group may travel large distances to find abundant food source such as a particularly favoured fruiting tree. 

They are monogamous with strong pair-bonds. These birds display effusive greetings bowing their heads and spread their tail fan. Rituals also include mutual exchange of food and loud calls when they perch in the treetops.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Isidro Vila Verde | Locality: Abuko Reserve, Sara Job Kunda, Western, The Gambia (2007)

(via koryos)

Filed under western grey plantain eaters turacos birds wildlife queue